Debian Linux Install MySQL Database Server

by on January 23, 2012 · 3 comments· LAST UPDATED November 13, 2013

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How do I install mysql database server on Debian Linux operating system running on an HP server? How do I install MySQL on Debian or Ubuntu server?

MySQL is a powerful and popular database management system for Linux and Unix like operating systems. You need to install the following packages on Debian:

Tutorial details
DifficultyEasy (rss)
Root privilegesYes
RequirementsDebian
Estimated completion timeN/A
  1. mysql-server - Install the latest stable MySQL database server binaries and system database setup on Debian.
  2. mysql-client - Install the latest stable MySQL database client binaries.

Installing MySQL server+client on Debian Linux

First, you need to type the following apt-get command or aptitude command to bring Debian to up to date state:
# aptitude update && aptitude upgrade
OR
# apt-get update && apt-get upgrade

Install MySQL

Open a terminal or login to the remote server using ssh client. Type the following apt-get command to install the MySQL:
# apt-get install mysql-server mysql-client
Sample outputs:

Reading package lists... Done
Building dependency tree
Reading state information... Done
The following packages were automatically installed and are no longer required:
  libxcb-render-util0-dev xulrunner-1.9.1 libxcb-render-util0
Use 'apt-get autoremove' to remove them.
Selecting previously deselected package libnet-daemon-perl.
(Reading database ... 159847 files and directories currently installed.)
Unpacking libnet-daemon-perl (from .../libnet-daemon-perl_0.43-1_all.deb) ...
Selecting previously deselected package libplrpc-perl.
Unpacking libplrpc-perl (from .../libplrpc-perl_0.2020-2_all.deb) ...
Selecting previously deselected package libdbi-perl.
Unpacking libdbi-perl (from .../libdbi-perl_1.612-1_amd64.deb) ...
Selecting previously deselected package libdbd-mysql-perl.
Unpacking libdbd-mysql-perl (from .../libdbd-mysql-perl_4.016-1_amd64.deb) ...
Selecting previously deselected package mysql-client-5.1.
Unpacking mysql-client-5.1 (from .../mysql-client-5.1_5.1.49-3_amd64.deb) ...
Selecting previously deselected package mysql-server-core-5.1.
Unpacking mysql-server-core-5.1 (from .../mysql-server-core-5.1_5.1.49-3_amd64.deb) ...
...
,...

During installation you will be promoted to setup a password for mysql admin "root" user:

Warning: if you are not asked to input MySQL root user's password during installation, type the following command to set/change MySQL root user's password on Debian Linux:
mysqladmin -u root password NEWPASSWORDNameHere

How Do I Start / Stop / Restart MySQL Server?

MySql will start on boot time. You can also type the following commands as root user to start / stop / restart the server:
# /etc/init.d/mysql start
# /etc/init.d/mysql stop
# /etc/init.d/mysql restart
# /etc/init.d/mysql status

OR
# service mysql start
# service mysql stop
# service mysql restart
# service mysql status

MySQL server configuration

The MySQL database server configuration file is located at /etc/mysql/my.cnf. Edit the file using a text editor such as vi, type:
# vi /etc/mysql/my.cnf
Sample outputs:

 
#
# The MySQL database server configuration file.
#
# You can copy this to one of:
# - "/etc/mysql/my.cnf" to set global options,
# - "~/.my.cnf" to set user-specific options.
#
# One can use all long options that the program supports.
# Run program with --help to get a list of available options and with
# --print-defaults to see which it would actually understand and use.
#
# For explanations see
# http://dev.mysql.com/doc/mysql/en/server-system-variables.html
 
# This will be passed to all mysql clients
# It has been reported that passwords should be enclosed with ticks/quotes
# escpecially if they contain "#" chars...
# Remember to edit /etc/mysql/debian.cnf when changing the socket location.
[client]
port            = 3306
socket          = /var/run/mysqld/mysqld.sock
 
# Here is entries for some specific programs
# The following values assume you have at least 32M ram
 
# This was formally known as [safe_mysqld]. Both versions are currently parsed.
[mysqld_safe]
socket          = /var/run/mysqld/mysqld.sock
nice            = 0
 
[mysqld]
#
# * Basic Settings
#
user            = mysql
pid-file        = /var/run/mysqld/mysqld.pid
socket          = /var/run/mysqld/mysqld.sock
port            = 3306
basedir         = /usr
datadir         = /var/lib/mysql
tmpdir          = /tmp
language        = /usr/share/mysql/english
skip-external-locking
#
# Instead of skip-networking the default is now to listen only on
# localhost which is more compatible and is not less secure.
bind-address            = 127.0.0.1
#
# * Fine Tuning
#
key_buffer              = 16M
max_allowed_packet      = 16M
thread_stack            = 192K
thread_cache_size       = 8
# This replaces the startup script and checks MyISAM tables if needed
# the first time they are touched
myisam-recover         = BACKUP
#max_connections        = 100
#table_cache            = 64
#thread_concurrency     = 10
#
# * Query Cache Configuration
#
query_cache_limit       = 1M
query_cache_size        = 16M
#
# * Logging and Replication
#
# Both location gets rotated by the cronjob.
# Be aware that this log type is a performance killer.
# As of 5.1 you can enable the log at runtime!
#general_log_file        = /var/log/mysql/mysql.log
#general_log             = 1
#
# Error logging goes to syslog due to /etc/mysql/conf.d/mysqld_safe_syslog.cnf.
#
# Here you can see queries with especially long duration
#log_slow_queries       = /var/log/mysql/mysql-slow.log
#long_query_time = 2
#log-queries-not-using-indexes
#
# The following can be used as easy to replay backup logs or for replication.
# note: if you are setting up a replication slave, see README.Debian about
#       other settings you may need to change.
#server-id              = 1
#log_bin                        = /var/log/mysql/mysql-bin.log
expire_logs_days        = 10
max_binlog_size         = 100M
#binlog_do_db           = include_database_name
#binlog_ignore_db       = include_database_name
#
# * InnoDB
#
# InnoDB is enabled by default with a 10MB datafile in /var/lib/mysql/.
# Read the manual for more InnoDB related options. There are many!
#
# * Security Features
#
# Read the manual, too, if you want chroot!
# chroot = /var/lib/mysql/
#
# For generating SSL certificates I recommend the OpenSSL GUI "tinyca".
#
# ssl-ca=/etc/mysql/cacert.pem
# ssl-cert=/etc/mysql/server-cert.pem
# ssl-key=/etc/mysql/server-key.pem
 
 
 
[mysqldump]
quick
quote-names
max_allowed_packet      = 16M
 
[mysql]
#no-auto-rehash # faster start of mysql but no tab completition
 
[isamchk]
key_buffer              = 16M
 
#
# * IMPORTANT: Additional settings that can override those from this file!
#   The files must end with '.cnf', otherwise they'll be ignored.
#
!includedir /etc/mysql/conf.d/
 

How do I connect to MySQL server?

Type the following command:
$ mysql -u root -p
Sample outputs:

Enter password:
Welcome to the MySQL monitor.  Commands end with ; or \g.
Your MySQL connection id is 37
Server version: 5.1.49-3 (Debian)
Copyright (c) 2000, 2010, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.
This software comes with ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY. This is free software,
and you are welcome to modify and redistribute it under the GPL v2 license
Type 'help;' or '\h' for help. Type '\c' to clear the current input statement.
mysql>

Where,

  • -u root: Login as admin root user.
  • -p : Prompt for root user password.

What next?

See how to setup a MySQL new user accounts and create a database/table to store your data for more information.

See also
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{ 3 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Vamsi February 6, 2012 at 12:14 pm

Hi !
do you recommend the use of mysql_secure_installation after installing mysql ?

Thanks !

Reply

2 Kurt Krueckeberg March 9, 2012 at 2:57 pm

The last lines of /etc/mysql/my.cnf are
# * IMPORTANT: Additional settings that can override those from this file!
# The files must end with ‘.cnf’, otherwise they’ll be ignored.
#
!includedir /etc/mysql/conf.d/

Can’t you simply supply a .cnf file in /etc/myql/conf.d/ that has your custom settings–like, for example, copying /usr/share/doc/mysql-server-5.1/examples/my-medium.cnf to /etc/mysql/conf.d ?

Reply

3 wtreker April 26, 2013 at 3:26 am

Thanks. Great reference material. It helped a lot.

Reply

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