HowTo: Create a Self-Signed SSL Certificate on Nginx For CentOS / RHEL

by on November 19, 2013 · 8 comments· LAST UPDATED November 19, 2013

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I operate a small web site on Cloud server powered by CentOS Linux v6.4. I would like to encrypt my site's information and create a more secure connection. How do I create a self-signed SSL certificate on Nginx for CentOS/Fedora or Red Hat Enterprise Linux based server?

Tutorial details
DifficultyAdvanced (rss)
Root privilegesYes
Requirementsopenssl
Estimated completion time15m

The ssl encrypts your connection. For example, a visit to https://www.cyberciti.biz/ result into the following:

  1. All pages were encrypted before being transmitted over the Internet.
  2. Encryption makes it very difficult to unauthorized person to view information traveling between client browser and nginx server.

A note about a self-signed certificates vs a third party issued certificates

Fig.01: Cyberciti.biz connection encrypted and verified by a third party CA called GeoTrust, Inc.

Fig.01: Cyberciti.biz connection encrypted and verified by a third party CA called GeoTrust, Inc.

  1. Usually, an SSL certificate issued by a third party. It provides privacy and security between two computers (client and server) on a public network by encrypting traffic. CA (Certificate Authorities) may issue you a SSL certificate that verify the organizational identity (company name), location, and server details.
  2. A self-signed certificate encrypt traffic between client (browser) and server. However, it can not verify the organizational identity. You are not depend upon third party to verify your location and server details.

Our sample setup

  • Domain name: theos.in
  • Directory name: /etc/nginx/ssl/theos.in
  • SSL certificate file for theos.in: /etc/nginx/ssl/theos.in/self-ssl.crt
  • ssl certificate key for theos.in: /etc/nginx/ssl/theos.in/self-ssl.key
  • Nginx configuration file for theos.in: /etc/nginx/virtual/theos.in.conf

Step #1: Make sure SSL aware nginx installed

Simply type the following command to verify nginx version and feature:
$ /usr/sbin/nginx -V
Sample outputs

nginx version: nginx/1.4.3
built by gcc 4.4.7 20120313 (Red Hat 4.4.7-3) (GCC)
TLS SNI support enabled
configure arguments: --prefix=/etc/nginx --sbin-path=/usr/sbin/nginx --conf-path=/etc/nginx/nginx.conf
...
....
..

If nginx is not installed, type the following command to download and install nginx using yum command:
# yum install nginx
See how to install Nginx web server On CentOS Linux 6 or Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 using yum command for more information.

Step #2: Create a directory

Type the following mkdir command to create a directory to store your ssl certificates:
# mkdir -p /etc/nginx/ssl/theos.in

Use the following cd command to change the directory:
# cd /etc/nginx/ssl/theos.in

Step #3: Create an SSL private key

To generate an SSL private key, enter:
# openssl genrsa -des3 -out self-ssl.key 1024
OR better try 2048 bit key:
# openssl genrsa -des3 -out self-ssl.key 2048
Sample outputs:

Generating RSA private key, 1024 bit long modulus
...++++++
...............++++++
e is 65537 (0x10001)
Enter pass phrase for self-ssl.key: Type-Your-PassPhrase-Here
Verifying - Enter pass phrase for self-ssl.key: Retype-Your-PassPhrase-Here

Warning: Make sure you remember passphrase. This passphrase is required to access your SSL key while generating csr or starting/stopping ssl.

Step #4: Create a certificate signing request (CSR)

To generate a CSR, enter:
# openssl req -new -key self-ssl.key -out self-ssl.csr
Sample outputs:

Enter pass phrase for self-ssl.key: Type-Your-PassPhrase-Here
You are about to be asked to enter information that will be incorporated
into your certificate request.
What you are about to enter is what is called a Distinguished Name or a DN.
There are quite a few fields but you can leave some blank
For some fields there will be a default value,
If you enter '.', the field will be left blank.
-----
Country Name (2 letter code) [XX]:IN
State or Province Name (full name) []:Delhi
Locality Name (eg, city) [Default City]:New Delhi
Organization Name (eg, company) [Default Company Ltd]:nixCraft LTD
Organizational Unit Name (eg, section) []:IT
Common Name (eg, your name or your server's hostname) []:theos.in
Email Address []:webmaster@nixcraft.com 
Please enter the following 'extra' attributes
to be sent with your certificate request
A challenge password []:
An optional company name []:

Step #5: Remove passphrase for nginx (optional)

You can remove passphrase from self-ssl.key for nginx server, enter:
# cp -v self-ssl.{key,original}
# openssl rsa -in self-ssl.original -out self-ssl.key
# rm -v self-ssl.original

Sample outputs:

Enter pass phrase for self-ssl.original: Type-Your-PassPhrase-Here
writing RSA key

Step #6: Create certificate

Finally, generate SSL certificate i.e. sign your SSL certificate with your own .csr file for one year:
# openssl x509 -req -days 365 -in self-ssl.csr -signkey self-ssl.key -out self-ssl.crt
Sample outputs:

Signature ok
subject=/C=IN/ST=Delhi/L=New Delhi/O=nixCraft LTD/OU=IT/CN=theos.in/emailAddress=webmaster@nixcraft.com
Getting Private key

Step #7: Configure the Certificate for nginx

Edit /etc/nginx/virtual/theos.in.conf, enter:
# vi /etc/nginx/virtual/theos.in.conf
The general syntax is as follows for nginx SSL configuration:

server {
    listen               443;
    ssl                  on;
    ssl_certificate      /path/to/self-ssl.crt;
    ssl_certificate_key  /path/to/self-ssl.key;
    server_name theos.in;
    location / {
       ....
       ...
       ....
    }
}

Here is my sample config for theos.in:

server {
    ###########################[Note]##############################
    ## Note: Replace IP and server name as per your actual setup ##
    ###############################################################
    ## IP:Port and server name
        listen 75.126.153.211:443;
        server_name theos.in;
    ## SSL settings
        ssl on;
        ssl_certificate /etc/nginx/ssl/theos.in/self-ssl.crt;
        ssl_certificate_key /etc/nginx/ssl/theos.in/self-ssl.key;
    ## SSL caching/optimization
        ssl_protocols        SSLv3 TLSv1 TLSv1.1 TLSv1.2;
        ssl_ciphers RC4:HIGH:!aNULL:!MD5;
        ssl_prefer_server_ciphers on;
        keepalive_timeout    60;
        ssl_session_cache    shared:SSL:10m;
        ssl_session_timeout  10m;
    ## SSL log files
        access_log /var/log/nginx/theos.in/ssl_theos.in_access.log;
        error_log /var/log/nginx/theos.in/ssl_theos.in_error.log;
    ## Rest of server config goes here
        location / {
                proxy_set_header        Accept-Encoding   "";
                proxy_set_header        Host              $http_host;
                proxy_set_header        X-Forwarded-By    $server_addr:$server_port;
                proxy_set_header        X-Forwarded-For   $remote_addr;
                proxy_set_header        X-Forwarded-Proto $scheme;
                proxy_set_header        X-Real-IP               $remote_addr;
                proxy_next_upstream error timeout invalid_header http_500 http_502 http_503 http_504;
                ## Hey, ADD YOUR location / specific CONFIG HERE ##
                ## STOP: YOUR location / specific CONFIG HERE ##
        }
}

Step #8: Restart/reload nginx

Type the following command
# /usr/sbin/nginx -t
Sample outputs:

nginx: the configuration file /etc/nginx/nginx.conf syntax is ok
nginx: configuration file /etc/nginx/nginx.conf test is successful

To gracefully restart/reload nginx server, type the following command:
# /etc/init.d/nginx reload
OR
# /usr/sbin/nginx -s reload
OR
# service nginx reload

Step #9: Open TCP HTTPS port # 443

Type the following command to open port # 443 for everyone:
# /sbin/iptables -A INPUT -m state --state NEW -p tcp --dport 443 -j ACCEPT
Save new firewall settings:
# service iptables save
See how to setup firewall for a web server for more information.

Step 10: Test it

Fire a browser and type the following url:

https://theos.in/

Sample outputs:

Fig.02: SSL connection is not verified due to self-signed certificate. Click the

Fig.02: SSL connection is not verified due to self-signed certificate. Click the "Add Exception" button to continue.

Step 11: Verify SSL certificats

You can verify SSL Certificate using the following command:
# openssl verify pem-file
# openssl verify self-ssl.crt

See also
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{ 8 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Bob November 19, 2013 at 2:33 pm

A 1024 bit private key is no longer considered acceptable. All the major CA’s are saying that 2048 is the acceptable minimum.

openssl genrsa -des3 -out self-ssl.key 1024 should be
openssl genrsa -des3 -out self-ssl.key 2048

Reply

2 nixCraft November 19, 2013 at 6:50 pm

Thanks for pointing out private key issue. I appreciate your post.

Reply

3 Prashant December 4, 2013 at 12:00 pm

Very useful information on how to use linux.

Reply

4 Rash February 8, 2014 at 12:03 pm

I want nginx to silently redirect all http requests to https.
How to do that?

Reply

5 Nix Craft February 8, 2014 at 12:10 pm
6 Alan Jebakumar February 21, 2014 at 11:57 pm

Hi,

Can the same steps be performed for creating a self signed ssl on a httpd web server on a CentOS?

Reply

7 Bob February 22, 2014 at 2:07 pm

Steps 1 through 6 would be the same. Steps 7 and 8 are for the nginx httpd server. Apache will be different.

Reply

8 Bob February 22, 2014 at 2:09 pm

Make that steps 3 through 6.
Sorry

Reply

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