Linux sys-unconfig: Reconfigure the System Upon Next Boot

by on July 22, 2012 · 0 comments· LAST UPDATED July 22, 2012

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I can use unconfigure command on a previously configured Solaris Unix box and leave it in an unconfigured state. How do I unconfigure CentOS Linux OR RHEL 6.x on HP server. How do I reconfigure the system upon next boot?

You can use sys-unconfig command whoch provides a simple method of reconfiguring a system in a new environment. Upon executing sys-unconfig will halt your system, and run the following configuration programs at boot:

  1. Change the root password.
  2. Reconfigure networking / routing.
  3. Reconfigure time / date / time zone etc.
  4. Reconfigure Keyboard and mapping.
  5. Reconfigure system authentication resources.
  6. Reconfigure system runlevel.
  7. Reconfigure system services.

Type the following command as root user. Warning: do not type the following command on a production server for just testing purpose. The system will go down immediately:
# sys-unconfig
This command will create a file called /.unconfigured. The presence of this file will cause /etc/rc.d/rc.sysinit to run the programs mentioned above. Also, all persistent rules will be deleted from /etc/udev/rules.d/.

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