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Ubuntu Linux stop / disable GNOME GUI ~ X.org

Q. I don’t need GUI as I’m developing CLI based applications. By default Ubuntu Loads Gnome GUI. How do I disable X.org / Gnome under Linux so that I get text only login?

A. You can use GUI tools or command line tools to disable GDM (Gnome Display Manager) service (/etc/init.d/gdm).

Disable GDM using GUI tools

The Services Administration Tool allows you to specify which services will be started during the system boot process. You can type the command:
services-admin &

Or just click on System > Administration > Services

Now you will be prompted for the administrator password, this is necessary because the changes done with this tool will affect the whole system. After entering the administrator password, the following window is displayed:

Ubuntu Linux stop / disable GNOME GUI (X.org)

Make sure you remove GDM (Gnome login manager) by disabling the the checkbox and close the window.

Enable GDM using Command Line (CLI) tools

Ubuntu comes with rcconf and update-rc.d command. rcconf allows you to control which services are started when the system boots up or reboots. It displays a menu of all the services which could be started at boot. The ones that are configured to do so are marked and you can toggle individual services on and off.

Install rcconf

Use apt-get command:
sudo apt-get install rcconf
Now start rcconf:
sudo rcconf
Again you will be prompted for the administrator password, this is necessary because the changes done with this tool will affect the whole system. After entering the administrator password, the following text based window is displayed on screen:
Ubuntu / Debian Runlevel configuration tool

Next enable GDM service by pressing space bar (check the checkbox) > Click OK to save the changes.

update-rc.d command

This is 3rd and old method. You can enable or disable any service using update-rc.d command.

Task: Disable X.org GUI

Just enter command:
sudo update-rc.d -f gdm remove

Task: Enable X.org GUI

Just enter command:
sudo update-rc.d -f gdm defaults

You can always start GUI from a shell prompt by typing startx command:
startx &

Please note that you can use above tools to enable or disable any services under Debian / Ubuntu Linux.

See also:

Linux change ip address

Q. How do I change ip address in Linux?

A. There are different ways to change IP address in Linux
(a) Command Line tools

(b) Modify configuration files

(c) Use GUI tools

Task: Display current IP address and setting for network interface called eth0

Use ifconfig command:
# ifconfig eth0
Output:

eth0      Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 00:30:48:5A:BF:46
          inet addr:10.5.123.2  Bcast:10.5.123.63  Mask:255.255.255.192
          inet6 addr: fe80::230:48ff:fe5a:bf46/64 Scope:Link
          UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
          RX packets:728204 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
          TX packets:1097451 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
          collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
          RX bytes:62774749 (59.8 MiB)  TX bytes:1584343634 (1.4 GiB)
          Interrupt:177

Task: Change IP address

You can change ip address using ifconfig command itself. To set IP address 192.168.1.5, enter command:
# ifconfig eth0 192.168.1.5 netmask 255.255.255.0 up
# ifconfig eth0

To make permanent changes to IP address you need to edit configuration file according to your Linux distribution.

Change IP address under RedHat / CentOS / Fedora core Linux

=> Please read - Howto change and setup IP address in Redhat Linux

Change IP address under Debian / Ubuntu Linux

=> Please read - Howto change and setup IP address in Ubuntu / Debian based Linux distros

Fedora core Linux sound card configuration

Q. How do I configure Fedora Linux sound card using GUI and command line tools?

A. You can use GUI tool called redhat-config-soundcard to configure sound under Fedora or Red Hat enterprise Linux or Cent OS etc.

Just type the following command:
redhat-config-soundcard &

If you didn't hear any sound use aumix to setup sound volume:
aumix &

Or try GUI tool:
gnome-volume-control &