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HowTo: OpenBSD Mount an NTFS File System

I'm dual booting my Windows XP system with OpenBSD. How do I mount an NTFS file system under OpenBSD operating systems?
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Apple Mac OS X Open And View .chm File

I know how to open .chm files under Linux, but how do you open and view .CHM files under Apple Mac OS X?
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Free DNS Server

Q. My ISP DNS servers are overloaded, can you give me free dns server IP address for fast name resolution?
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Linux mount CIFS Windows Share

Q. How do I mount CIFS Windows Server / XP / Vista Shared folder under Linux operating systems?
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How do I find out my DHCP server address?

Q. In Windows XP / 2000 / Vista ipconfig /all command will show me DNS server and DHCP server ip address. But, how to know DHCP server address in Linux?

A. The DHCP protocol allows a host to contact a central server which maintains a list of IP addresses which may be assigned on one or more subnets. A DHCP client may request an address from this pool, and then use it on a temporary basis for communication on network.

dhclient.leases file

Under Linux you use command dhclient to obtain and managing dhcp tasks. In order to keep track of leases across system reboots and server restarts, dhclient keeps a list of leases it has been assigned in the dhclient.leases file. On startup, after reading the dhclient.conf file, dhclient reads the dhclient.leases file to refresh its memory about what leases it has been assigned.

When a new lease is acquired, it is appended to the end of the dhclient.leases file. In order to prevent the file from becoming arbitrarily large, from time to time dhclient creates a new dhclient.leases file from its in-core lease database. The old version of the dhclient.leases file is retained under the name dhclient.leases~ until the next time dhclient rewrites the database.

Find out DHCP server address

Usually dhclient.leases file is located at /var/lib/dhcp3/dhclient.leases, type the following command:
less /var/lib/dhcp3/dhclient.leases
OR
cat /var/lib/dhcp3/dhclient.leases
Alternatively, you can just use grep command to get DHCP server address, enter:
grep dhcp-server-identifier /var/lib/dhcp3/dhclient.leases
Output:

lease {
  interface "ra0";
  fixed-address 192.168.1.106;
  option subnet-mask 255.255.255.0;
  option dhcp-lease-time 86400;
  option routers 192.168.1.1;
  option dhcp-message-type 5;
  option dhcp-server-identifier 192.168.1.1;
  option domain-name-servers 208.67.222.222,208.67.220.220;
  option dhcp-renewal-time 43200;
  option dhcp-rebinding-time 75600;
  option host-name "vivek-desktop";
  renew 0 2007/12/9 05:17:36;
  rebind 0 2007/12/9 15:06:37;
  expire 0 2007/12/9 18:06:37;
}
lease {
  interface "ra0";
  fixed-address 192.168.1.106;
  option subnet-mask 255.255.255.0;
  option routers 192.168.1.1;
  option dhcp-lease-time 86400;
  option dhcp-message-type 5;
  option domain-name-servers 208.67.222.222,208.67.220.220;
  option dhcp-server-identifier 192.168.1.1;
  option dhcp-renewal-time 43200;
  option dhcp-rebinding-time 75600;
  option host-name "vivek-desktop";
  renew 0 2007/12/9 06:11:22;
  rebind 0 2007/12/9 16:13:50;
  expire 0 2007/12/9 19:13:50;
}

A note about RHEL / CentOS / Fedora Linux user

Redhat and friends uses /var/lib/dhcp/dhclient.leases file:
less /var/lib/dhcp/dhclient.leases

Q. How do verify my MD5 checksum of an ISO file under Windows XP? The Linux ISO images downloaded from the net onto Windows XP system.

A. Under Linux or UNIX you can use MD5 checksum command to calculate the MD5 checksum of a file or an ISO image.

Under Windows XP and other Windows operating system you need to use a special program called winMD5Sum. It is a simple open source Windows MD5 checke to calculate the MD5 checksum of a file or an ISO image.

Download winmd5sum

  • You can download the winmd5sum here
  • Install the software

MD5 checksum is one of the most common signature to make sure that a file that you have downloaded is not corrupt. Some websites post the MD5 checksum of a file on their download page. Once you have downloaded the file, use winMd5Sum to get the MD5 checksum of the file on your computer. Then make sure that the MD5 checksum from the web site is the same. If they are the same, then your file is exactly the same as the file on the website.

Access Linux From Windows XP / Vista / 7 Systems

How do I access Linux from Windows Vista or XP or 7 operating systems?
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