Gnome

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Repetitive strain injury (RSI) is occupational overuse syndrome, non-specific arm pain or work related upper limb disorder. RSI caused from overusing the hands to perform a repetitive task, such as typing, writing, or clicking a mouse. Unfortunately, most people do not understand what RSI is or how serious it can be. You can easily prevent RSI using open source software called Workrave.

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Fedora Linux version 11 has been released and available for download ( jump to download link ). Fedora Linux is a community-based Linux distribution. Fedora is sponsored by Red Hat, Inc.

One of Fedora’s main objectives is not only to contain free and open source software, but also to be on the leading edge of such technologies. Fedora 11, codenamed “Leonidas”, was released on June 9, 2009. The features include ext4, a 20-second startup, and the latest GNOME, KDE and XFCE releases. Firefox 3.5 and Thunderbird 3′s latest pre-releases are available as well.

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I haven’t had to use MS-Office / word in years and I have never had a problem with awesome OpenOffice.org software. I have been using it in Linux for a long time, and recently at work we started using it in windows-xp systems too. I have also got a couple other people in my school, work and small business to use it as well. This tutorial explains the approach you take when you want to print labels under Ubuntu Linux using gLabels. It is a label, business and media cover designer for the GNOME. The intuitive editor allows to create text fields, insert images, simple objects, and create barcodes. It is designed to work with common laser/inkjet printers peel-off label and business card sheets. From the article:

Ubuntu has no shortages of software for printing labels. Many users content themselves with the label and mail merge features in OpenOffice.org Writer or in Abiword or KOffice. All these solutions will do a basic job, especially with text. But what if you want elaborate formatting or graphics with your labels? What if you want a smaller, dedicated program that is quicker to load than a complete word processor? In these cases, you should consider turning to gLabels instead.

=> Printing Labels in Ubuntu

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Linus Torvalds, Linux’s creator, dislikes the GNOME desktop. There was a big flame war(s) between Linus Torvalds and the GNOME community. At one point he claimed that – “Gnome seems to be developed by interface Nazis and that its developers believe their users are idiots“. And guess what? Who made the switch to Gnome?

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openoffice

Mail merge is a software function describing the production of multiple documents from a single template form and a structured data source. This helps to create personalized letters and pre-addressed envelopes or mailing labels for mass mailings from a word processing document which contains fixed text, which will be the same in each output document, and variables, which act as placeholders that are replaced by text from the data source. The data source is typically a spreadsheet or a database which has a field or column matching each variable in the template. When the mail merge is run, the word processing system creates an output document for each row in the database, using the fixed text exactly as it appears in the template, but substituting the data variables in the template with the values from the matching columns.

This technique of merging data to create mailshots gave rise to the term mail merge. OpenOffice.Org has a in built software mail merge feature.

If you haven’t tried OpenOffice.org’s mail merge feature because you find it confusing or difficult to use, you are in luck. Mail Merges in OpenOffice.org and StarOffice provides a detailed description of the mail merge feature from start to finish. Among other things, it shows how you can use the mail merge to create letters, labels, and envelopes.

=> You can download this excellent PDF ebook for your persusal or read the article online – Mail Merge in Openoffice.org: Everything You Need to Know.

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Canonical the makers of Ubuntu about to introduce a new desktop notification system proposal. New changes should improve the usability of the Linux desktop including desktop notification system for both GNOME and KDE. From the Mark Shuttleworth blog:

The key proposals we are making are that:

* There should be no actions on notifications.

* Notifications should not be displayed synchronously, but may be queued. Our implementation of the notification display daemon will display only one notification at a time, others may do it differently.

That’s pretty much it. There are some subtleties and variations, but these are the key changes we are proposing, and which we will explore in a netbook device with a partner, as well as in the general Ubuntu 9.04 release, schedule gods being willing.

I think new changes looks more like Growl system used in Mac OS X. You can read more about proposal including mockup video that shows new notification system here.

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Excellent collection of short tips except for recommending root login! From the article:

The end of October saw the much anticipated release of Ubuntu 8.10 – affectionately called the Intrepid Ibex.

It’s a release that sees Ubuntu going from strength to strength.

And with its popularity reaching stratospheric proportions, we thought that now was the perfect time to pool together our favourite tips into one place.

If you’ve never tried Ubuntu, there’s never been a better time to dive in. If you’re already a convert, read on to discover how to get the best from your installation.

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