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Man pages are written by sys-admin and developers for IT techs, and are intended more as a reference than as a how to. Man pages are very useful for people who are already familiar with Linux, Unix, and BSD operating systems. Use man pages when you just need to know the syntax for particular commands or configuration file, but they are not helpful for new Linux users. Man pages are not good for learning something new for the first time. Here are thirty best documentation sites on the web for learning Linux and Unix like operating systems.
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pssh: Run Command On Multiple SSH Servers

I've already written about tentakel tool and shell script hack to run a single command on multiple Linux / UNIX / BSD server. This is useful to save time and run UNIX commands on multiple machines. Linux.com has published an article about a new and better tool called pssh:

If you want to increase your productivity with SSH, you can try a tool that lets you run commands on more than one remote machine at the same time. Parallel ssh, Cluster SSH, and ClusterIt let you specify commands in a single terminal window and send them to a collection of remote machines where they can be executed.

UNIX or UNIX like operating system offers many flavors. Most Microsoft users are stuck with Windows NT / 2003 only. However, UNIX users can select a variety of UNIX like oses:
+ HP-UX
+ Linux ( Red Hat / Debian / Suse and other distros)
+ Solaris / OpenSolaris
+ AIX
+ BSD (FreeBSD / OpenBSD / NetBSD) etc

Few years back I used work at largest ISP in India and our team used to mange an average 8 operating systems to support our enterprise grade customers. It was headache for me as I had to document, patch and monitor each operating system. These days I recommend selecting one operating system, which may result into saving time and money. But, how do you select perfect UNIX operating system for your business? You should always consider following factors while selecting UNIX like oses:

Ease of use - Must be easy to use.

Reliability & Stability - OS must be stable to run your business and should work under heavy loads.

Budget - No one has unlimited budget or luxury to select fancy stuff. Evaluate pricing based upon your own IT budget.

Hardware / driver support - Does UNIX hardware vendor offer good support?

Application support - Does it run Oracle or ERP software? Make sure all software compatible with os.

Vendor support - Does UNIX vendor offer good support? Does that includes phone support or email support or onsite support?

Security features - Look for security features and past security track record

Addon features - Look for bundled features such as backup utility or special software. Can you modify kernel? Can filesystem hold millions of tiny files and so on.

Expertise - How much experience and expertise you have on staff to manage OS.

Scalability - Will OS scale with your business? How does OS scale when the business grows? Watch out for clustering and HA support.

OS market share - Find out if OS dominates market. A massive user base means good support and lots of skilled workers.

Community support - The best support can come from newsgroup, forums or mailing list.

Patch management - Are patches available immediately? Find out more about security disclosure policy.

Staff training and certification support.

If in doubt, ask other people or admins - Talk to your users and find their requirements. Ask to other admins or people about the requirements rather than vendor. People using UNIX oses for a long time have practical knowledge of many things and they may able to provide guideline.

Good news and great contribution from HP. You can study all those advanced features for academic project.

AdvFS is a file system that was developed by Digital Equipment Corp and continues to be part of HP's
Tru64 operating system. It offers many advanced features. Continuing its efforts to advance customer adoption of Linux, HP today announced the contribution of its Tru64 UNIX Advanced File System (AdvFS) source code to the open source community. The code on this site is licensed under the GPLv2 to be compatible with the Linux kernel.

The AdvFS source code includes capabilities that increase uptime, enhance security and help ensure maximum performance of Linux file systems. HP will contribute the code as a reference implementation of an enterprise Linux file system under the terms of General Public License Version 2 for compatibility with the Linux kernel, as well as provide design documentation, test suites and engineering resources.

Now the million dollar question - Is there any reason to pick AdvFS fs over any of the other 20+ file systems such as XFS/ext2/ext3 under Linux?

Intelligent Platform Management Interface (IPMI) is a hardware level interface specification that defines a common, abstracted, message-based interface to platform monitoring and control functions. Both IPMI and KVM over IP can be used in emergency situations.
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Under Linux / UNIX you use lp command to print files from command prompt. lp is quite useful when GUI is not installed on Linux box to print files. The lp command is simply a front end command that calls the lpr command with appropriate options. Its main use is to allow the running of precompiled binary programs and scripts that assume that the lp command is the official printing command.

Changing papa size is very easy under GUI environment. But how do you change paper size under command prompt?
By default lp print to A4 paper size. However sometime you need to print to different paper size from command prompt such as A3 or A5. To print to A3 size, enter:
$ lp -o media=A3 /path/to/file
Where,

  • -o media=size : Sets the page size to size. Most printers support at least the size names "a4", "letter", and "legal".

Other useful examples

Print a double-sided legal document to a printer called "hpljf2":
$ lp -d hpljf2 -o media=legal -o sides=two-sided-long-edge /path/to/file
Print an image across 4 pages using a printer called "epd2":
$ lp -d epd2 -o scaling=200 filename
Print a text file with 12 characters per inch, 8 lines per inch, and a 1 inch left margin to a printer called "lpodc2":
$ lp -d lpodc2 -o cpi=12 -o lpi=8 -o page-left=72 ~/info.txt

To know more about lp option, enter:
$ man lp

Please note that you need to configure print using CUPS configuration file /etc/cups/cupsd.conf or web based tool located at http://localhost:631/
Linux / UNIX CUPS HP printer at http://localhost:631/
(Fig 01: My CUPS Configuration, showing HP PhotoSmart Printer )

Linux Success Story: New York Stock Exchange Moves to Linux

The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), is the largest stock exchange in the world. NYSE wants to move away from proprietary platforms, so they selected HP hardware with Linux.

NYSE is investing heavily in x86-based Linux systems and blade servers as it builds out the NYSE Hybrid Market trading system that it launched last year. Flexibility and lower cost are among the goals. But one of the things that NYSE Euronext CIO Steve Rubinow says he most wants from the new computing architecture is technology independence. The NYSE has installed about 200 of HP's ProLiant DL585 four-processor servers and 400 of its ProLiant BL685c blades, all running Linux and based on dual-core Opteron processors from Advanced Micro Devices Inc.

=> New York Stock Exchange Moves to Linux (Image credit: Wikipedia)