Linux distribution

Man pages are written by sys-admin and developers for IT techs, and are intended more as a reference than as a how to. Man pages are very useful for people who are already familiar with Linux, Unix, and BSD operating systems. Use man pages when you just need to know the syntax for particular commands or configuration file, but they are not helpful for new Linux users. Man pages are not good for learning something new for the first time. Here are thirty best documentation sites on the web for learning Linux and Unix like operating systems.

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Linux comes with a host based firewall called Netfilter. According to the official project site:

netfilter is a set of hooks inside the Linux kernel that allows kernel modules to register callback functions with the network stack. A registered callback function is then called back for every packet that traverses the respective hook within the network stack.

This Linux based firewall is controlled by the program called iptables to handles filtering for IPv4, and ip6tables handles filtering for IPv6. I strongly recommend that you first read our quick tutorial that explains how to configure a host-based firewall called Netfilter (iptables) under CentOS / RHEL / Fedora / Redhat Enterprise Linux. This post list most common iptables solutions required by a new Linux user to secure his or her Linux operating system from intruders.

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The latest version of the popular Linux desktop distribution Ubuntu 9.10 has been released and available from the official project web site. New features since Ubuntu 9.04 includes – Firefox 3.5, GNOME 2.28, an enforcing AppArmor profile, Linux kernel 2.6.31, ext4 file system (default), Empathy instant messenger instead of Pidgin, the Ubuntu One client, which interfaces with Canonical’s new on-line storage system. It also includes a new application called the Ubuntu Software Center. A quick screen-shot tour of new features available here on our website.

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Red Hat Enterprise Linux v5.4 has been released and available via RHN for immediate update. The new version includes the kernel-based virtual machine (KVM) virtualization, next generation of developer features and tools including GCC 4.4, a new malloc(). Also included clustered, high-availability filesystem to support Microsoft Windows storage needs on Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

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Slackware 13.0 Download

Slackware version 13.0 has been released and available for download from the official project website. This release brings with it many major changes since Slackware 12.2, including a completely reworked collection of X packages (a configuration file for X is no longer needed in most cases), major upgrades to the desktop environments (KDE version 4.2.4 and Xfce version 4.6.1), a new .txz package format with much better compression, and other upgrades all around — to the development system, network services, libraries, and major applications like Firefox and Thunderbird. Also, this is the first release of Slackware with native support for the 64-bit x86_64 architecture!

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Microsoft chief operating officer Kevin Turner recently talked about netbook and claimed that retailers experiencing higher return rates as compare to MS-Windows operating systems:

And the reason that we were able to make so much traction – because this is the first real test of the value of Windows – the reason we were able to make so much traction on this particular space is because we went to retailers and said, “Hey, what are your return rates on these Linux netbooks that you are getting?” And they said, “Oh, gosh, they’re, like, four or five times higher than what we’re seeing on other PCs that have Windows.” I said, “Exactly.” So let’s do the TCO story. Let’s talk to customers. And you can’t find a retailer – I challenge you to find a retailer who wants to sell Linux on these netbooks, because the returns are bad. The customer complaints are bad. And our ability to really showcase the value proposition with Windows has never been greater and was never tested more than it was with this particular product. But we’ve made great progress there, but the up-sell opportunities with Windows 7, because it runs so well on these low-end laptops, is going to be tremendous for us.

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CentOS is a community-supported, freely-available operating system based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux. Lance Davis created CentOS and now he goes absent without leave. In an open letter from his fellow CentOS developers:

You have long promised a statement of CentOS project funds; to this date this has not appeared. You hold sole control of the centos.org domain with no deputy; this is not proper. You have, it seems, sole ‘Founders’ rights in the IRC channels with no deputy ; this is not proper.

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