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Linux Embedded devices

Linux: 20 Iptables Examples For New SysAdmins

Linux comes with a host based firewall called Netfilter. According to the official project site:

netfilter is a set of hooks inside the Linux kernel that allows kernel modules to register callback functions with the network stack. A registered callback function is then called back for every packet that traverses the respective hook within the network stack.

This Linux based firewall is controlled by the program called iptables to handles filtering for IPv4, and ip6tables handles filtering for IPv6. I strongly recommend that you first read our quick tutorial that explains how to configure a host-based firewall called Netfilter (iptables) under CentOS / RHEL / Fedora / Redhat Enterprise Linux. This post list most common iptables solutions required by a new Linux user to secure his or her Linux operating system from intruders.
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Linux Server with Embedded Display

Looks nice but this hack is not for the faint hearted!

Old Gateway PC transformed into a Linux server with embedded display

Old Gateway PC transformed into a Linux server with embedded display

Old Gateway PC transformed into a Linux server with embedded display, which is a hacked portable B&W TV driven directly by the VGA card.

Embedded Linux is the use of a Linux operating system in an embedded computer systems such as a mobile phones, personal digital assistants, media players etc.

This tutorial shows you how to install Linux on a target system. Not a prebuilt Linux distribution, but your own, built from scratch. While the details of the procedure necessarily vary from one target to another, the same general principles apply. The result of this tutorial (if you have a suitable target) is a functional Linux system you can get a shell prompt on.

In this tutorial, you will learn about:

  1. Discussion of cross-compilation issues
  2. Review of the components of a Linux system and how they are put together
  3. Detailed steps for building, installing, and configuring the target system

=> Build an embedded Linux distro from scratch (free registration required)

Great information on how to install Fedora Linux on PS3. This is 3 part series.

Part 1 the Sony PlayStation 3 (PS3) runs Linux®, but getting it to run well requires some tweaking. In this article, first in a series, Peter Seebach introduces the features and benefits of PS3 Linux, and explains some of the issues that might benefit from a bit of tweaking.

Part 2 of this series discusses getting the latest PS3 addons installed and updated on your system, and some of the configuration changes you can make to reduce the basic memory footprint until you've got a bit of breathing room.

Part 3 in this series looks at what you can do to get a usable X environment for doing simple graphical work, without losing the ability to run the compiler.

5 Reasons To Avoid Apple iPhone 3G

Free software foundation (GNU project) has published a list of 5 reasons to avoid Apple iPhone 3G. According to article Apple puts so many restrictions on you including privacy and DRM limitations:

[1] iPhone completely blocks free software. Developers must pay a tax to Apple, who becomes the sole authority over what can and can't be on everyone's phones.

[2] iPhone endorses and supports Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) technology.

[3] iPhone exposes your whereabouts and provides ways for others to track you without your knowledge.

[4] iPhone won't play patent- and DRM-free formats like Ogg Vorbis and Theora.

[5] iPhone is not the only option. There are better alternatives on the horizon that respect your freedom, don't spy on you, play free media formats, and let you use free software -- like the FreeRunner.

=> 5 reasons to avoid iPhone 3G

Update: Checkout Top 10 reasons to hate the iPhone 3G (thanks pushpraj)

Good news for all hackers.

NETGEAR launches Open Source edition of wireless-G router enabling Linux developers, geeks, hackers and enthusiasts to create Firmware for specialized applications

Open Source Wireless-G Router (WGR614L) delivers higher processing power and more memory for a Wide Variety of customized applications. The product is supported by a dedicated and responsive open source community.

Tech Specs

The high-performance WGR614L, which is "Works with Windows Vista" certified, features a 240 MHz MIPS32 CPU core with 16 KB of instruction cache, 16 KB of data cache, 1 KB of pre-fetch cache, and incorporates 4 MB of flash memory and 16 MB of RAM. In addition to an external 2 dBi antenna, the WGR614L integrates a second internal diversity antenna to provide enhanced performance and range. The router supports free open source Linux-based Tomato and DD-WRT firmware and will soon support OpenWRT.

NETGEAR WGR614L Open Source Router

Community support

The WGR614L is supported by a dedicated open source router community at myopenrouter.com.


  • Open source - free to install any firmware
  • Hotspots, guest access via a separate SSID
  • Upstream and downstream QOS and intelligent bandwidth monitoring
  • One 10/100 Internet WAN port and a four-port 10/100 LAN switch
  • 802.11g access point (54 Mbps).
  • Static and dynamic routing with TCP/IP, VPN pass-through (IPSec, L2TP), NAT, PPTP, PPPoE, DHCP (client and server), and Bigpond.
  • A Stateful Packet Inspection (SPI) firewall
  • Support for 40-, 128- and 152-bit WEP encryption, Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA), WPA2-PSK, and Wi-Fi Protected Setup (WPS).
  • Additional security features include DMZ, MAC address authentication, URL content filtering, logs and e-mail alerts of Internet activity.

WGR614L Wireless-G Router Price

The NETGEAR Open Source Wireless-G Router is available at a retail price in the U.S. of $69.

Moblin.org is an open source community for sharing software technologies, ideas, projects, code, and applications to create an untethered computing experience across Mobile Internet Devices (MIDs), Netbooks, and embedded devices.

Now, Intel and Wind River Systems have teamed up to create a Linux/x86 platform for car electronics, which will debut at the Telematics Detroit 2008 conference today (May 20). The offering is based on Intel's low-power Atom processor and a new variant of Wind River's embedded Linux.

Wind River announced that its Linux Platform for Infotainment, optimized for Intel's Atom, should be available in August. It will include speech-recognition and speech-to-text software from Nuance Communications, Bluetooth and noise reduction from Parrot, music management from Gracenote, networking from SMSC and DVD playback from Corel.

The software will provide connectivity with Apple iPods and support 3D interfaces. It will also support the Controller Area Network and Media-Oriented Systems Transport buses used to link electronics in many cars.

More information: Wind River, Intel ride Linux into car market