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Make money with Linux

Make money with Linux: Becoming a Linux OEM

You can make money by selling Linux based Laptop and desktop systems. Dell and other vendor started the same. There is huge market for Linux desktop systems. This article talks about entering a world where Microsoft rules the marketplace:

For years, Microsoft has reigned supreme as the 'only' choice for OEM partners on the x86 architecture. Later on, Apple switched from PPC (Power PC) to x86, but really did not make a dent in the OEM market, as Apple produces its own hardware, with OS X being a means to that end. Then it happened: Dell dropped their hat into the ring, perhaps prompting what could become a rush of other PC manufacturers and distributors wishing to enter into OEM deals with various Linux distributions. Keep in mind that Dell is hardly doing anything new here. There have been a number of smaller companies that have worked within the Linux space for some time now. Generally referred to as distributors, their goal remains the same – selling pre-installed Linux-based computers to their customers.

=> Becoming a Linux OEM: A Roadmap

This is yet another example that shows us one can make money with open source software.

Network security specialist Sourcefire announced Friday that it has acquired ClamAV, an open-source gateway anti-malware project whose technologies are used in the products of a number of other vendors:

With nearly 1 million unique IP addresses downloading ClamAV malware updates daily across more than 120 mirrors in 38 countries, ClamAV is one of the most broadly adopted open source security projects worldwide. ClamAV has also been recognized as comparable in quality and coverage to leading commercial anti-virus solutions. Most recently, at LinuxWorld this year, ClamAV was one of only three anti-virus technologies to provide a 100% detection rate in their live 'Fight Club' test featuring live submissions from the show audience.

Sourcefire said that under the terms of the deal, it has purchased all of the project's technology and related trademarks, as well as the copyrights controlled by all developers involved in the effort, including its founder Tomasz Kojm.

Linux journal has published a fantastic story that recognizes usage of Linux and Open Source in the file and animation industry. DreamWorks Animation pushes the limits of CG filmmaking with Linux. From the article:

All the big film studios primarily use Linux for animation and visual effects. Perhaps no commercial Linux installation is larger than DreamWorks Animation, with more than 1,000 Linux desktops and more than 3,000 server CPUs.

"For Shrek 3, we will consume close to 20 million CPU render hours for the making of the film", says DreamWorks Animation CTO Ed Leonard. "Each of our films continues to push the edge of what's possible, requiring more and more compute power." Everyone knows Moore's Law predicts that compute power will double every one and a half years. A little known corollary is that feature cartoon animation CPU render hours will double every three years. In 2001, the original Shrek movie used about 5 million CPU render hours. In 2004, Shrek 2 used more than 10 million CPU render hours. And in 2007, Shrek 3 is using 20 million CPU render hours.

"At any given time, we are working on more than a dozen films", says Leonard. "Each of those films has its own creative ambition to push the limits of CG filmmaking." DreamWorks Animation employs about 1,200 people, with about two-thirds in their Glendale studio and the rest in their PDI studio in Redwood City linked by a 2Gb network. (Note that DreamWorks Animation, a publicly traded company led by Jeffrey Katzenberg, isn't Steven Spielberg's DreamWorks live-action that merged with Paramount recently.)

"There were many specific technical advancements on the movie, including advancements in hair, clothing, costuming and crowds as well as bringing the secondary character animation [crowds] to a whole new level of performance", says Leonard. About 350 people are working on Shrek 3, with about 300 at PDI and 50 in Glendale.

The Huge Server Farm at DreamWorks Animation  used to create Shrek the Third animation movie

DreamWorks Animation studio is powered by HP workstations and Redhat Linux distributions (image credit Linux Journal).

DreamWorks Animation "Shrek the Third": Linux Feeds an Ogre

This is yet another upcoming story for open source software. According to IDC:

Sales of open source software will grow from $1.8bn last year to $5.8bn in 2011. Matt Lawton, programme director for IDC's Open Source Software Business Models research programme, typified the current market as "immature" and in the "early stages".

The projected revenue figure is low when compared to commercial, closed source software. But the analyst believes that revenues alone do not reflect the actual distribution of open source software.


HP got huge Linux desktop order

Yet another good story for Linux, more and more business are pushing Linux desktop systems. There is a good demand for Linux desktop system. If you consider MS Vista price, DRM shit, strict licensing, and current software / driver compatibility issues, this is a wise move for any business.

According to this article:
Hewlett-Packard is closing custom deals for thousands of desktop PCs running Linux, which has the company assessing the possibility of offering factory-loaded Linux systems, an HP executive said.

We are involved in a number of massive deals for Linux desktops, and those are the kinds of things that are indicators of critical mass. So we are really looking at it very hard.

Now you don’t have to pay Microsoft tax :D

Dell customer demanding free Linux version pre-installation on all Dell PCs to cut down cost.

Now Dell announced that - It’s exciting to see the IdeaStorm community’s interest in open source solutions like Linux and OpenOffice. Your feedback has been all about flexibility and we have seen a consistent request to provide platforms that allow people to install their operating system of choice. We are listening, and as a result, we are working with Novell to certify our corporate client products for Linux, including our OptiPlex desktops, Latitude notebooks and Dell Precision workstations. This is another step towards ensuring that our customers have a good experience with Linux on our systems.

As this community knows, there is no single customer preference for a distribution of Linux. In the last week, the IdeaStorm community suggested more than half a dozen distributions. We don't want to pick one distribution and alienate users with a preference for another. We want users to have the opportunity to help define the market for Linux on desktop and notebook systems. In addition to working with Novell, we are also working with other distributors and evaluating the possibility of additional certifications across our product line.

This is great news. I only purchase Dell laptops and rest of my system is build using components (whitebox). My next desktop machine will be dell for sure. However using Linux on corporate desktop is still a big dream because of MS Exchange, custom made support & sales software etc. I hope this will also change in coming days.

If you think you can’t make money by supporting free community-based Linux distributions.. think again.

The maker of sever and printer called Hewlett Packard (HP) is making $25 million by supporting the free Debian GNU/Linux distribution through out in Europe, the Middle East and Africa.

So it is turn out to be a challenge to commercial distributions from Novell and Red Hat.

It now plans to have all Proliant and Blade System Servers supported by Debian fairly soon :D

HP support is set for the Debian Sarge release, which debuted in June 2005. Wade marketing manager of open source and Linux at HP, noted that HP is working toward certifying its hardware against the upcoming Debian Etch release, which is set for a 2007 rollout.