OS X

Google Chrome is a web browser developed by Google and based on the WebKit layout engine and application framework. On January 08, 2009 Google introduced a new release channels system, and now there are three distinct release channels – Stable channel, Beta channel, and Developer preview channel.

Google has released Chrome 1.0 on Dec – 2008, and now the company is all set to release version 2.0 (pre – beta version) of its web browser. From the release notes:

New version of WebKit. WebKit is the open source code Google Chrome uses to render web pages (HTML and CSS). 1.0.154.36 used basically the same version of WebKit as Safari 3.1, but the WebKit team has made a lot of improvements since that was released. 156.1 uses WebKit version 528.8 or, more precisely, revision 39410 from the WebKit source tree. In addition to fixing bugs and enabling features like full-page zoom and autoscroll, the new version also enables some nifty CSS features.

New network code. Google Chrome now has its own implementation of the HTTP network protocol (we were using the WinHTTP library on Windows, but need common code for Mac and Linux). We fixed a few bugs in HTTP authentication and made Google Chrome more compatible with servers that reply with invalid HTTP responses. We need feedback on anything that’s currently broken, particularly with proxy servers, secure (https) sites, and sites that require log in.

Look like the Mac and Linux versions of Chrome are getting closer. Are you going to switch to Google Chrome under Linux?

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The Linux Foundation is launching a video contest and you can win yourself a trip to Tokyo next year to participate in the Linux Foundation Japan Linux Symposium Oct, 2009.

If you’ve been alive and aware of mass media over the last twelve months, you’ve probably seen television commercials from Apple and Microsoft touting their operating system. From Apple’s ubiquitous “I’m a Mac” to Jerry Seinfeld to Microsoft’s “I’m a PC” retort, operating system commercials have been flooding the airways. Except one OS has been notably absent — Linux.


You can upload your contest video here.

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Mozilla has released software updates to fix at least 8 security vulnerabilities (3 critical bugs) in its Firefox software for the Windows, Linux, Mac and other platforms. You can now download Firefox version 3.0.5. This update has been rated as having important security impact.

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The USB Overdrive is a device driver for Mac OS X that handles any USB mouse / trackball / joystick / gamepad and any Bluetooth mouse from any manufacturer and lets you configure them either globally or on a per-application basis. Some one posted a screen shot of USB Overdrive software. If you are a sensitive pirate you might feel guilty (found via Digg). Maybe it is a time to switch to Linux.

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Jim Zemlin is executive director of the Linux Foundation has posted some interesting information and very bold prediction about Linux desktop.

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