UNIX

Shell script wrappers can make the *nix command more transparent to the user. The most common shell scripts are simple wrappers around third party or system binaries. A wrapper is nothing but a shell script that includes a system command or utility.

Linux and Unix like operating system can run both 32bit and 64bit specific versions of applications. You can write a wrapper script that can select and execute correct version on a 32bit or 64bit hardware platform. In cluster environment and High-Performance computing environment you may find 100s of wrapper scripts written in Perl, Shell, and Python to get cluster usage, setting up shared storage, submitting and managing jobs, backups, troubleshooting, invokes commands with specified arguments, sending stdout to stdout and stderr to stderr and much more.

In this post, I will explains how to create a shell wrapper to enhance the basic troubleshooting tool such as ping and host.

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In Linux and UNIX in general, services are configured using various text files,in the /etc/ directory trees. A typical server system could have dozens of configuration files. It is important that you check the validity of the configuration file. In some cases it is possible to to check the sanity of the special data (such as keys) or directories (such as /var/lib/cache/). Text files are easier to manage remotely. You can use ssh and a text editor. If there is an error in configuration, server may not start. This may result into a disaster. In this article I will explains howto find out a syntax error for popular servers and test configuration file for syntax errors.

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Man pages are written by sys-admin and developers for IT techs, and are intended more as a reference than as a how to. Man pages are very useful for people who are already familiar with Linux, Unix, and BSD operating systems. Use man pages when you just need to know the syntax for particular commands or configuration file, but they are not helpful for new Linux users. Man pages are not good for learning something new for the first time. Here are thirty best documentation sites on the web for learning Linux and Unix like operating systems.

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Unhide is a little handy forensic tool to find hidden processes and TCP/UDP ports by rootkits / LKMs or by another hidden technique. This tools works under both Linux / Unix, and MS-Windows operating systems. From the man page:

It detects hidden processes using three techniques:

  1. The proc technique consists of comparing /proc with the output of /bin/ps.
  2. The sys technique consists of comparing information gathered from /bin/ps with information gathered from system calls.
  3. The brute technique consists of bruteforcing the all process IDs. This technique is only available on Linux 2.6 kernels.

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You can now enjoy mysteries of the sea from the safety of your own terminal using ASCIIQuarium. It is an aquarium/sea animation in ASCII art created using perl.

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The $ character is used for parameter expansion, and command substitution. You can use it for manipulating and/or expanding variables on demands without using external commands such as sed or awk.

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