Finding out who is logged on to a Solaris system

by on June 15, 2006 · 1 comment· LAST UPDATED June 15, 2006

in , ,

Sun Solaris offers different command to find out who is logged on to a Solaris system.

Following list summaries command name according to a task:

a) Display current process information for each FTP Server user. Type the following commands

$ ftpwho
$ ftpcount

b) Find out who is on the system
Displays list of users (user’s name), terminal, login name, elapsed time since activity occurred on the line, and the process-ID of the command interpreter (shell) for each current UNIX system user.

$ who
$ who -b
$ who -r

Where,

  • -b : Indicates the time and date of the last reboot.
  • -r : Display the current run-level of the init process.

c) Display information about currently logged-in users
The w command displays a summary of the current activity on the system, including what each user is doing. The heading line shows the current time, the length of time the system has been up, the number of users logged into the system, and the average number of jobs in the run queue over the last 1, 5 and 15 minutes.

$ w

d) Find out who is logged in on remote machines

$ rusers remoteserver

See also

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1 Joseph June 29, 2010 at 2:17 pm

I have a Solaris 9 system where I can do:

ps -ef |grep user01

and see a user logged in. But when I do:

w |grep user01

They do not show up. Also, if I do:

last user01

I do not see the current logged in user.

What could cause this?

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