Kids says never heard of MS – Windows

by on September 25, 2006· LAST UPDATED September 25, 2006

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This is yet another prime example how India is adopting Linux and open source technologies. I have already witnessing more and more government funded project moving to Linux based technologies.

I always try to convince others that Linux will not just give us rock solid platform but it will also saves the tons of money.

From the article:
With 4,000 students and just 21 computers, the Cotton Hill Girls High School in the south Indian city of Trivandrum wouldn't appear to be at the vanguard of anything related to information technology. Yet the 71-year-old school is abandoning Microsoft (MSFT) Windows software in favor of its free, open-source rival, Linux. So when students -- typically eight to a machine, seated at two benches -- turn on their PCs they see Linux desktop software that helps them navigate their way to all manner of math, graphics, and writing programs. "We're using something called Linux," says 12-year-old Arya VM as she plays with Tux Paint, a Linux drawing and painting application. And Windows? "Never heard of it,"' she says.

So if you are reading this from India and looking for some rock solid career, start learning Linux. There is a great demand or shortage of trained man power in Linux. You can easily get well paid job, if you have right certification and basic qualification. Companies such as Red Hat and IBM support the software -- for a fee -- but they're having trouble finding Linux-trained engineers in India.

Microsoft is getting upset about this move...

Home user in India uses pirated version of Windows. I have moved to Linux desktop in 1999 and never looked back. I saved lots of money on software; these days I only spend money on hardware. All my personal computer runs on Linux or FreeBSD. I am sure Microsoft freaked out of all these news...

While "it's too early to say"' whether Linux has hurt sales, "we are concerned"' about its rise, says Radhesh Balakrishnan, Microsoft's director of platform strategy for India, who moved from the U.S. in July. "We need to demonstrate superior value to our customers," he says.

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