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Adobe announced that the Flash player for Linux will only be available for Google Chrome browser on Linux and has announced their plans to abandon future updates of Flash player for Linux. From the blog post:

For Flash Player releases after 11.2, the Flash Player browser plugin for Linux will only be available via the "Pepper" API as part of the Google Chrome browser distribution and will no longer be available as a direct download from Adobe. Adobe will continue to provide security updates to non-Pepper distributions of Flash Player 11.2 on Linux for five years from its release.

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I use Google Calendar exclusively. However to access this product you need to use a web browser. There is nice program called gcalcli (Google Calendar Command Line Interface) which allows to access Google Calendar from bash shell. Now I can see an agenda using a specified start/end time and date from a shell prompt over ssh session :D

gcalcli is a Python application that allows you to access you Google Calendar from a command line. It's easy to get your agenda, search for events, and quickly add new events. Additionally gcalcli can be used as a reminder service to execute any application you want.

Current Features

  1. List your calendars
  2. Show an agenda using a specified start/end time and date
  3. Search for calendar events
  4. "Quick add" new calendar events to your default calendar
  5. Run as a cron job and execute a command for reminders
  6. Work against specific calendars (default, owner, read-only)
  7. Color support
  8. unicode support

Download Google Calendar Command Line Interface

=> Visit official project page here

Comparison: Linux vs FreeBSD (Bsd) oses

If you would like to compare FreeBSD and Linux, then keep in mind following points:

* SMP support

* Portability

* Reliability/robust

* Performance

* Security

* Filesystem

* Support (community and vendor)

* Clean code and well documented API

* Amount of software/applications

* 3rd party apps support

SMP supportGood (v5.x/6.x+)Very Good (2.6+)
Reliability/robustVery GoodGood
PerformanceVery GoodGood
Security (out of box)Very goodGood
Oracle/ERP appsNot supportedVery good
Package managementExcellent (ports & binary)Depends on distribution (Debian - excellent, RPM based - ok (go for yum))
Dell/IBM/HP server supportN/A (FreeBSD works with these vendors systems; at least I have very good experience with HP boxes)Very good
Support (community and vendor)GoodGood

Based upon my personal experience I recommend FreeBSD for Internet server (webserver or mail servers). They are extremely stable. FreeBSD is known to handle heavy load efficiently.

However, if you are looking to run 4 or 8 way SMP server or Oracle database server, use Linux (go for RHEL or Suse enterprise Linux). Linux has excellent support from these vendors.

In addition, OpenBSD is my choice for firewall/NAT/DMZ. :D If anyone has more information, just comment it below.

Further reading: