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Video Contest: I am Linux

The Linux Foundation is launching a video contest and you can win yourself a trip to Tokyo next year to participate in the Linux Foundation Japan Linux Symposium Oct, 2009.

If you've been alive and aware of mass media over the last twelve months, you've probably seen television commercials from Apple and Microsoft touting their operating system. From Apple's ubiquitous "I'm a Mac" to Jerry Seinfeld to Microsoft's "I'm a PC" retort, operating system commercials have been flooding the airways. Except one OS has been notably absent – Linux.

You can upload your contest video here.

Jim Zemlin is executive director of the Linux Foundation has posted some interesting information and very bold prediction about Linux desktop:

For those that decry the constant prediction of the "year of the Linux desktop". I am happy to say that next year Linux may actually ship on more desktops than Windows or the Mac. That is right, I said next year. What is driving this? Two words: fast boot.

=> Linux to Ship on More Desktops than Windows

Richard Stallman, founder of the Free Software Foundation published an interesting article on BBC news website. From the article:

To pay so much attention to Bill Gates' retirement is missing the point. What really matters is not Gates, nor Microsoft, but the unethical system of restrictions that Microsoft, like many other software companies, imposes on its customers. But Gates didn't invent proprietary software, and thousands of other companies do the same thing. It's wrong, no matter who does it.

Microsoft, Apple, Adobe, and the rest, offer you software that gives them power over you. A change in executives or companies is not important. What we need to change is this system.

That's what the free software movement is all about. "Free" refers to freedom: we write and publish software that users are free to share and modify.

=> It's not the Gates, it's the bars

Apple has released 230 page guide for securing and safeguarding Mac OS X system from the hackers and crackers. The Security Configuration Guides provide an overview of features in Mac OS X that can be used to enhance security, known as hardening your computer. Using this guide you can:

=> Lock down the system.
=> Protect Mac OS x from external attackers.
=> Avoid unauthorized access
=> Secure Mac by hardening your computer.
=> Mac OS X security and much more.

However, guide is heavily depend upon shell prompt (read as terminal) to perform recommended tasks. So you need to have some basic knowledge of terminal. From the Apple site:

Certain instructions in the guides are complex, and deviation could result in serious adverse effects on the computer and its security. The guides should only be used by experienced Mac OS X users, and any changes made to your settings should be thoroughly tested.

Download Mac OS X Security Configuration Guides

Download guide for Mac OS X v10.5 (Leopard) / Mac OS X v10.4 (Tiger) / Mac OS X v10.3 (Panther):

This blog post covers many applications which can be used to increase your productivity without spending a single penny.

From the article:

Sure, Apple's built its reputation on being the hipster brand of choice, but one of the nice things about Linux is the ability to customize virtually any aspect of the operating system to cater to your workflow and computing habits.

For the purpose of structure I'll break the article into two parts. The first will discuss how Linux can be just as application-rich, in terms of usefulness, as OS X or Windows. In the second half, I'll cover various productivity-boosting apps and features that allow you do accomplish virtually any task with a few simple keystrokes.

=> Full-throttle Productivity and Web-Work With Ubuntu

This is an excellent backup utility for new Linux user.

Apple's Time Machine is a great feature in their OS, and Linux has almost all of the required technology already built in to recreate it. This is a simple GUI to make it easy to use.

Time Machine, like many backup utilities, creates incremental backups of files which can be restored at a later date. It also supports limited restoration of files within applications that are specifically programmed to use Time Machine's functionality.
FlyBack: a Time Machine backup utility for Linux
(Fig. 01: Linux FlyBack Software in Action)

Download and Installation instructions

=> FlyBack - Apple's Time Machine for Linux (via Bernaz's Weblog)

Mac ZFS Source Code Released

ZFS has amazing feature set and now it is ported to Mac

ZFS file system developed by Sun for its UNIX operating system. ZFS presents a pooled storage model that completely eliminates the concept of volumes and the associated problems of partitions, provisioning, wasted bandwidth and stranded storage. Thousands of filesystems can draw from a common storage pool, each one consuming only as much space as it actually needs. The combined I/O bandwidth of all devices in the pool is available to all filesystems at all times.

Apple has ported ZFS from Open Solaris to the Mac OS X platform. You can download ZFS beta version here (via ./).