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Ubuntu Linux Remix For Intel Atom Processor

Intel Atom processor used by ultra-mobile PCs, smart phone, other portable and low-power applications. Ubuntu announced Ubuntu Linux Remix, the new operating system will be targeted to OEM vendors that are building their own netbooks for sale to end users. From the press release:

Canonical, the commercial sponsor of Ubuntu, today announced that it will be demonstrating a reworked desktop image of Ubuntu built specifically for a new category of portable Internet-centric devices – netbooks. These affordable, power-efficient, small screen devices, based on the ground breaking low-power micro-architecture of the Intel Atom processor, and Ubuntu allow consumers to enjoy email, instant messaging, Internet surfing and on-line access to photos, videos or music with an affordable, reliable device.

=> Canonical Showcases Ubuntu Netbook Remix at Computex

Nice introduction to SELinux and other option to enhance Linux security. Mandatory access control and role-based access control are relatively new to the Linux kernel. With the introduction of the LSM framework, new security modules will certainly become available. In addition to enhancements to the framework, it's possible to stack security modules, allowing multiple security modules to coexist and provide maximum coverage for Linux's security needs. New access-control methods will also be introduced as research into operating system security continues. From the article:

Linux has been described as one of the most secure operating systems available, but the National Security Agency (NSA) has taken Linux to the next level with the introduction of Security-Enhanced Linux (SELinux). SELinux takes the existing GNU/Linux operating system and extends it with kernel and user-space modifications to make it bullet-proof. If you're running a 2.6 kernel today, you might be surprised to know that you're using SELinux right now! This article explores the ideas behind SELinux and how it's implemented.

=> Anatomy of Security-Enhanced Linux (SELinux) Architecture and implementation

Linux can be used a real time operating system ( RTOS ) for thermostats, household appliance controllers, mobile telephones, industrial robots, spacecraft, industrial control and scientific research equipment.

Linux is not only a perfect platform for experimentation and characterization of real-time algorithms, you can also find real time in Linux today in the standard off-the-shelf 2.6 kernel. You can get soft real-time performance from the standard kernel or, with a little more work (kernel patch), you can build hard real-time applications.

This article explores some of the Linux architectures that support real-time characteristics and discusses what it really means to be a real-time architecture. Several solutions endow Linux with real-time capabilities, and in this article author examine the thin-kernel (or micro-kernel) approach, the nano-kernel approach, and the resource-kernel approach. Finally, author describe the real-time capabilities in the standard 2.6 kernel and show you how to enable and use them.

This small guide may come handy...

From the article:

One great thing about Linux is that you can transplant a hard disk from a machine that runs a 32-bit AMD XP processor into a new 64-bit Intel Core 2 machine, and the Linux installation will continue to work. However, if you do this, you'll be running a 32-bit kernel, a C library, and a complete system install on a processor that could happily run 64-bit code. You'll waste even more resources if your new machine has 4GB or more of system memory, and you'll be forced to either not use some of it or run a 32-bit Physical Address Extension (PAE) kernel. Cross-grading to the 64-bit variant of your Linux distribution can help you use your resources more wisely. A disclaimer: changing the architecture of your Fedora installation from 32 to 64-bit isn't recommended or supported in any way. Perform this at your own risk after creating a suitable backup.

=> Upgrade from 32-bit to 64-bit Fedora Linux without a system reinstall [linux.com]

nixCraft FAQ Roundup June 07, 2007

Recently updated/posted Linux and UNIX FAQ (mostly useful to Linux/UNIX new administrators or users) :