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The US Department of Justice announced Tuesday that 11 people allegedly involved in the cracking of nine major U.S. retailers and the theft and sale of more than 40 million credit and debit card number have been charged. This is considered as the largest-ever identity theft case.

From the BBC news:

The 11 suspects are alleged to have obtained card numbers, account information and password details by driving around neighbourhoods and hacking into wireless equipment.

They are said to have then concealed the information in computer servers both in the US and Europe.

The Department of Justice said the scam caused "widespread" losses among banks, retailers and ordinary consumers - although it did not put a precise figure on the financial damage.

I've already written about few basic tips about securing wifi router. The man in the middle attacks are real and many thinks that it was FUD. Have you been a victim of credit or debit card identity theft? Add your comments below.

Richard Stallman, founder of the Free Software Foundation published an interesting article on BBC news website. From the article:

To pay so much attention to Bill Gates' retirement is missing the point. What really matters is not Gates, nor Microsoft, but the unethical system of restrictions that Microsoft, like many other software companies, imposes on its customers. But Gates didn't invent proprietary software, and thousands of other companies do the same thing. It's wrong, no matter who does it.

Microsoft, Apple, Adobe, and the rest, offer you software that gives them power over you. A change in executives or companies is not important. What we need to change is this system.

That's what the free software movement is all about. "Free" refers to freedom: we write and publish software that users are free to share and modify.

=> It's not the Gates, it's the bars

Spam now makes up more than 80% of mail message traffic. The first recognizable e-mail marketing message was sent on 3 May, 1978 to 400 people on behalf of DEC - a now-defunct computer-maker. You can see the first spam message here (archived version) including interview with Thuerk, the sender. From the BBC news page:

Statistics gathered by the FBI suggest that 75% of net scams snare people through junk e-mail. In 2007 these cons netted criminals more than $239m

Statistics suggest that more than 80%-85% of all e-mail is spam or junk and more than 100 billion spam messages are sent every day.

The majority of these messages are being sent via hijacked home computers that have been compromised by a computer virus.

Spam reaches 30-year anniversary