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Install Linux On Intel Xeon 7400 Dunnington

Dunnington is Intel's first multi-core CPU - features a single-die six- (or hexa) core design with three unified 3 MB L2 caches (resembling three merged 45 nm dual-core Wolfdale dies), and 96 KB L1 cache (Data) and 16 MB of L3 cache. It features 1066 MHz FSB, fits into the Tigerton's mPGA604 socket, and is compatible with the Caneland chipset. These processors support DDR2-1066 (533 MHz), and have a maximum TDP below 130 W. They are intended for blades and other stacked computer systems.

I've Sun Blade X6450 server for ERP application:

The four-socket Sun Blade X6450 server module features Intel Xeon processor 7000 series and up to 192 GB of memory. With 24 DIMM slots per server module, it gives you 50 percent more memory capacity than competing blade servers making it an ideal fit for virtualization and server consolidation, HPC, database and enterprise applications. Fill a Sun Blade 6048 chassis for a remarkable 11TFLOPS of peak performance and up to 1152 processing cores per rack.

Fig.01: Sun Blade X6450 Server Module showing the internals

Fig.01: Sun Blade X6450 Server Module showing the internals

I tried old RHEL version and it failed to work because of old kernel. So I called to Redhat support and they told me to use at least kernel 2.6.18-92.1.10 and above. The problem is my client do not have RHEL 5.2 media and License (server came with Solaris 10). So I asked my client to get RHEL 5.2. Unfortunately, their local software vendor was out of stock for RHEL software. It took 5 days to get software media kit.

Finally, I've installed it on Sun blade server. It is working fine now. I wish I knew about latest Intel Xeon 7400 support problem earlier. It may have saved some time, effort, traveling and money on my part. I should have gone though server datasheet. This server only works with RHEL version 4.7 or 5.2 (32/64 bit) and above.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.2 Released

Red Hat enterprise Linux version 5.2 has been released and available via a Red Hat Network subscription. This update brings broad refresh of hardware support and improved quality, combined with new features and enhancements in areas such as virtualization, desktop, networking, storage & clustering and security.

Virtualization of very large systems, with up to 64 CPUs and 512 GB of memory, is now possible. Virtualization support for NUMA-based architectures is provided, as well as security, performance, manageability and robustness improvements. CPU frequency scaling support for virtualized environments also allows for reduced power consumption.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.2 provides enhanced capabilities for several hardware architectures, covering x86/x86-64, Itanium, IBM POWER and IBM System z, which provide improved performance, power usage, scalability and manageability. For example, support for Intel's Dynamic Acceleration Technology permits power saving by quiescing idle CPU cores, and offers performance gains by potentially overclocking busy cores within safe thermal levels. Other hardware enhancements include extensive device driver updates, covering storage, network and graphics devices, and certification of IBM's new Cell Blade systems.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux becomes a certified operating system for IBM's new high-performance blade server based on Cell Broadband Engine (Cell/B.E) Architecture.

Desktop version includes latest cutting edge softwares:

  • Evolution 2.12.3
  • Firefox 3
  • OpenOffice 2.3.0
  • Thunderbird 2.0

Red Hat Cluster Suite, which is included in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 Advanced Platform, now has a Resource Event Scripting Language that enables sophisticated application failover capabilities. It also newly supports SCSI-3 reservation fencing support for active/active and active/passive DM/MPIO (multipathing), which widens the range of storage devices that can be used in clusters.

Improved iSCSI support allows users to set-up diskless systems with a root volume on the iSCSI server, a common requirement in high-density Blade environments.

How do I upgrade my system?

First, make sure you backup existing configuration and data. Next, simply type the following two commands:
# yum update
# reboot

Verify that everything is working fine including all services:
# netstat -tulpn
# netstat -nat
# tail -f /var/log/messages
# egrep -i 'error|warn' /var/log/messages
# egrep -i 'error|warn' /path/to/apps/log/file

Alternatively, you can click on the "Red Hat Network Alert Notification GUI Tool" - which is a notifier that appears on the panel and alerts users when software package updates are available for the systems. This is point and click method.

If you are CentOS Linux user wait for some time to get all updates. More information available at Red Hat web site.

Get Free Interactive Shell Access to Linux / BSD and UNIX Like Operating Systems

From my mail bag:

Where can I get free interactive access to HP-UX or Linux distro or UNIX shell access?

You can simply grab and try out any Linux / BSD / Solaris Live CD. However, some time you cannot install and use particular UNIX like os. So, if you want to try the latest technologies over the Internet? Try HP TestDrive program:

This program allows you to testdrive some of the hottest hardware and operating systems available today. Have you ever wanted to try out HP's exciting 64-bit Integrity and PA-RISC technology? Get time on SMP x86 and Opteron ProLiant servers? Try out a Blade server. Try different Open Source operating systems such as FreeBSD, Suse, Redhat, Debian and other Linux distributions.

This program is perfect for students and new users to try out and learn basis of UNIX. You can also try and test your C/C++ programs using latest Intel compilers. It is intended for those users who want to sample the 32- and 64-bit servers running a variety of HP, UNIX, Linux and third-party operating systems and applications.

=> HP Test Drive Program [hp.com]