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HP Releases Tru64 UNIX Advanced File System ( AdvFS ) Source Code

Good news and great contribution from HP. You can study all those advanced features for academic project.

AdvFS is a file system that was developed by Digital Equipment Corp and continues to be part of HP's
Tru64 operating system. It offers many advanced features. Continuing its efforts to advance customer adoption of Linux, HP today announced the contribution of its Tru64 UNIX Advanced File System (AdvFS) source code to the open source community. The code on this site is licensed under the GPLv2 to be compatible with the Linux kernel.

The AdvFS source code includes capabilities that increase uptime, enhance security and help ensure maximum performance of Linux file systems. HP will contribute the code as a reference implementation of an enterprise Linux file system under the terms of General Public License Version 2 for compatibility with the Linux kernel, as well as provide design documentation, test suites and engineering resources.

Now the million dollar question - Is there any reason to pick AdvFS fs over any of the other 20+ file systems such as XFS/ext2/ext3 under Linux?

OpenSolaris Hardware Compatibility List ( HCL )

This might come handy...

The HCL (Hardware Compatibility List) now includes OpenSolaris content. Sun's hardware compatibility list includes the systems and components that run OpenSolaris, and the drivers and devices it supports.

=> HCL for OpenSolaris

GPL v2.0 is Perfect for Linux – Says Linus Torvalds

Linux creator Linus Torvalds, in an interview being made public by the Linux Foundation Tuesday, stressed that version 2 of the GPL (GNU General Public License) still makes the most sense for the Linux kernel over the newer GPL version 3. Among GPL 3 highlights are protections against patent infringement lawsuits and provisions for license compatibility. Torvalds acknowledged he had spoken out against GPL 3 before it was released. He had opposed digital rights management provisions in early-2006, calling them burdensome.

Linus Torvalds, programmer, creator of the Linux kernel

On patent trolls, he says:

Yeah, they're kind of like the tourists that you can't bomb because there's nothing there to bomb. There are just these individuals that don't have anything to lose. That breaks the whole cold war model and seems to be one of the reasons that even big companies are now starting to realize that patents and software are a really bad idea.

The in-depth discussion has been split into two parts; the first segment is available today at Linux foundation blog. The next installment will be available in two weeks. Transcripts are also available on the LF website.

=> You can listen to complete conversations podcast here. If you'd rather read a transcript, you can find it here. (via Yahoo news - Image credit Wikipedia Linus article)

Linux success story – Using Linux at Work

Yet another Linux success story, from the article:

I am by no stretch of the imagination a Linux expert, but my overall experience has been excellent and I shall continue to use Fedora for my day to day work. My productivity has not been affected at all, and anyone who wants to try something different, or take a cheaper OS route, should consider a look at Linux - it's really not that scary.

I've been programming since a young age, and Linux has always seemed like a natural progression, especially as my development environment is PHP/MySQL/Apache. A while ago, this was all done on a Red Hat installed system, using the "Plesk" web interface. Although I spent quite a few hours at the console sorting out problems, Plesk hid the real nitty gritty from me and I was often just following "How Tos" in order to get things fixed. In saying that, I did manage to write a wrapper script that fixed a compatibility between MailMan and Plesk, so I wasn't doing too badly. However, I would hardly say I felt confident in Linux, and using it for my day to day work seemed strangely frightening.

Read more, Using Linux at Work...