≡ Menu

cpu utilization

How do I find out Linux Disk utilization?

I've already written about finding out Linux / UNIX cpu utilization using various tools. You can use same iostat command to find out disk utilization and for monitoring system input/output device loading by observing the time the physical disks are active in relation to their average transfer rates.

iostat syntax for disk utilization report

iostat -d -x interval count

  • -d : Display the device utilization report (d == disk)
  • -x : Display extended statistics including disk utilization
  • interval : It is time period in seconds between two samples . iostat 2 will give data at each 2 seconds interval.
  • count : It is the number of times the data is needed . iostat 2 5 will give data at 2 seconds interval 5 times

Display 3 reports of extended statistics at 5 second intervals for disk

Type the following command:
$ iostat -d -x 5 3
Output:

Linux 2.6.18-53.1.4.el5 (moon.nixcraft.in)   12/17/2007
Device:         rrqm/s   wrqm/s   r/s   w/s   rsec/s   wsec/s avgrq-sz avgqu-sz   await  svctm  %util
sda               1.10    39.82  3.41 13.59   309.50   427.48    43.36     0.17   10.03   1.03   1.75
sdb               0.20    18.32  1.15  6.08   117.36   195.25    43.22     0.51   71.14   1.26   0.91
Device:         rrqm/s   wrqm/s   r/s   w/s   rsec/s   wsec/s avgrq-sz avgqu-sz   await  svctm  %util
sda               0.00   108.40  1.40 64.40    49.60  1382.40    21.76     0.04    0.67   0.44   2.92
sdb               0.00    37.80  0.00 245.20     0.00  2254.40     9.19    28.91  108.49   1.08  26.36
Device:         rrqm/s   wrqm/s   r/s   w/s   rsec/s   wsec/s avgrq-sz avgqu-sz   await  svctm  %util
sda               0.00    97.01  1.00 57.29    39.92  1234.33    21.86     0.03    0.58   0.50   2.89
sdb               0.00    38.32  0.00 288.42     0.00  2623.55     9.10    32.97  122.30   1.15  33.27

Where,

  • rrqm/s : The number of read requests merged per second that were queued to the hard disk
  • wrqm/s : The number of write requests merged per second that were queued to the hard disk
  • r/s : The number of read requests per second
  • w/s : The number of write requests per second
  • rsec/s : The number of sectors read from the hard disk per second
  • wsec/s : The number of sectors written to the hard disk per second
  • avgrq-sz : The average size (in sectors) of the requests that were issued to the device.
  • avgqu-sz : The average queue length of the requests that were issued to the device
  • await : The average time (in milliseconds) for I/O requests issued to the device to be served. This includes the time spent by the requests in queue and the time spent servicing them.
  • svctm : The average service time (in milliseconds) for I/O requests that were issued to the device
  • %util : Percentage of CPU time during which I/O requests were issued to the device (bandwidth utilization for the device). Device saturation occurs when this value is close to 100%.

How do I interpret the output result for optimization?

First you need to note down following values from the iostat output:

  1. The average service time (svctm)
  2. Percentage of CPU time during which I/O requests were issued (%util)
  3. See if a hard disk reports consistently high reads/writes (r/s and w/s)

If any one of these are high, you need to take one of the following action:

  • Get high speed disk and controller for file system (for example move from SATA I to SAS 15k disk)
  • Tune software or application or kernel or file system for better disk utilization
  • Use RAID array to spread the file system

For example, from about iostat report it appears that /dev/sdb under load. Hope this information will help you diagnose and optimize disk related issues.

Related: How to find out Linux CPU utilization using vmstat, iostat, mpstat and sar commands.

Please note that command and information discussed here almost applies to any other UNIX like variant.

Display real-time system information from your Linux box on a LCD with LCDproc software

I’m currently working on a small project. I came across cool software called LCDproc. If you have HD44780-based display you can build really cool system for just US $15.

LCDproc is a piece of software that displays real-time system information from your Linux/*BSD box on a LCD. The server supports several serial devices: Matrix Orbital, CrystalFontz, Bayrad, LB216, LCDM001, Wirz-SLI, Cwlinux(.com) and PIC-an-LCD; and some devices connected to the LPT port: HD44780, STV5730, T6963, SED1520 and SED1330. Various clients are available that display things like CPU load, system load, memory usage, uptime, and a lot more. CDproc supports Linux, FreeBSD, OpenBSD, NetBSD, Darwin and Solaris (beta support). LCDproc cycles through several screens of information. The screen order and display duration can be configured at run-time.

The CPU Utilization screen displays the system’s current CPU utilization. These values are the normal values reported by Linux.

Above is the CPU Utilization screen displays the system's current CPU utilization. These values are the normal values reported by Linux. The percentage in the title bar is the sum of all non-idle cycles, and the bar graph at the bottom of the display reflects this percentage.

Download LCDproc software

=> Visit LCDproc Project Home Page.

How do I Find Out Linux CPU Utilization?

Whenever a Linux system CPU is occupied by a process, it is unavailable for processing other requests. Rest of pending requests must wait till CPU is free. This becomes a bottleneck in the system. Following command will help you to identify CPU utilization, so that you can troubleshoot CPU related performance problems on a Linux based system.
[click to continue…]