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cross platform

How To Write Object-Oriented Shell scripts For Multiple Platforms

This may come handy while writing cross-platform scripts.

If you don't want to commit to the idiosyncrasies of a specific shell running on a particular platform, try the Squirrel Shell. The Squirrel Shell provides an advanced, object-oriented scripting language that works equally well on UNIX, Linux, Mac OS X, and Windows systems. Write a script once, and run it anywhere.

Squirrel is a high level imperative/OO programming language, designed to be a light-weight scripting language that fits in the size, memory bandwidth, and real-time requirements of applications like video games.

=> Speaking UNIX: The Squirrel portable shell and scripting language

Download Google Gadgets for Linux

Google gadgets is an open-source implementation of Google gadgets platform for Linux and is now available for download. It is the first cross-platform desktop gadgets framework that works with Linux, Windows and Mac OS X computer system. From the google blog:

For Gadgets for Linux, we don't just want to simply release the final offering, but we also want to give everyone a chance to tinker with the code powering the gadgets. For this project, fostering a transparent and lively developer community is just as important as serving our users.

Google Gadgets for Linux provides a platform for running desktop gadgets under Linux, catering to the unique needs of Linux users. We are compatible with the gadgets written for Google Desktop for Windows as well as the Universal Gadgets on iGoogle. Following Linux norms, this project will be open-sourced, under the Apache License.

Google Gadgets for Linux

Download Google Gadgets for Linux

You can download Google Gadgets for Linux here at project website.

Download of The Day: CRON-O-Meter Open Source Dieting Software

CRON-O-Meter is free, open source, and cross-platform (Windows, Linux and Mac OS X) dieting software written in Java. It is a fully featured nutrition and biomarker tracking tool. Designed for practitioners of Caloric Restriction (CRON) Diets.

From the project site:

CR (Calorie Reduced) diets require a lot of information to perform optimally. In order to restrict caloric intake, but remain healthy, users of the diet must track their vitamin, mineral, and protein intakes with great care.

We aim to provide a complete solution to the CR dieter. Current open-source diet-tracking applications fall short in some vital respects. Either they are not detailed enough, or they suffer from critical usability flaws. We believe that a diet tracker must be effortless to operate for the activity for which it will be used most of the time, keeping track of the foods eaten in a particular meal.

To this end, we are developing CRON-O-Meter, an application that will take into account good usability design and dense functionality. It will provide diet advice, track consumption and exercise, and generally assist in all aspects of a CR diet.

Download CRON-O-Meter

Microsoft To Extend Systems Management To Linux / UNIX

Microsoft is extending its management software to Linux and Unix by integrating some of the open source OpenPegasus project's code into System Center Operations Manager. You can use this software to manage your Linux / UNIX boxes:

Today Microsoft announced a few new beta products – two of which came from our team. The System Center Operations Manager 2007 Cross Platform Extensions, which enable customers to manage Unix/Linux systems from Operations Manager 2007, was delivered as a beta today.

=> Microsoft Uses Open Source To Extend Systems Management To Linux

Create Encrypted System Partition Under Linux / Windows / Mac OS X

TrueCrypt is a software application used for on-the-fly encryption (OTFE). It is free and open source software. TrueCrypt is available for Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux. This software can protect date. It encrypts data stored on a computer's disk and transparently decrypts the information when a user requests it. No special action by the user is required. From the Linux.com article:

Last month the TrueCrypt Foundation released TrueCrypt 5.0, which finally introduces a Linux GUI for the cross-platform encryption application. TrueCrypt 5.0's numerous other enhancements include a Mac OS X port, XTS operation mode, the ability to encrypt a system partition or drive under Windows, and the addition of the SHA-512 hash algorithm

=> Encrypt volumes through a cross-platform GUI with TrueCrypt 5.0

Download of the day: KDE 4 Desktop

KDE4 has been released and available for download. KDE is a powerful graphical desktop environment for Unix and Linux workstations. It is based on the version 4 series of Qt (a cross-platform GUI application development framework).

From the announcement page:

The KDE Community is thrilled to announce the immediate availability of KDE 4.0. This significant release marks both the end of the long and intensive development cycle leading up to KDE 4.0 and the beginning of the KDE 4 era. It will contain a new multimedia API, called Phonon, a device integration framework called Solid and a new style guide and default icon set called Oxygen. It will also include the new desktop and panel user interface tool, called Plasma, which will have support for desktop widgets, similar to SuperKaramba or Apple's Dashboard widgets.

KDE 4 Desktop
(Fig. 01: The KDE v.4.0 Desktop)

The KDE 4.0 Visual Guide provides a quick overview of various new and improved KDE 4.0 technologies. Illustrated with many screenshots, it walks you through the different parts of KDE 4.0 and shows some of the exciting new technologies and improvements for the user.

Download KDE 4

=> Visit offical mirror to grab cutting edge KDE v4.0

Download of the day: RPM Software Package Manager Version 5.0

RPM 5.0.0 has been released.

RPM Package Manager is a software package manager for UNIX and Linux distribution. It is a powerful and command-line package management system capable of installing, uninstalling, verifying, querying, and updating Unix binary / source software packages. RPM was originally written in 1997 by Erik Troan and Marc Ewing for use in the Red Hat Linux distribution. These you can use RPM under many Linux distribution and various UNIX variant such as AIX / OpenSolaris etc. From the press release:

After seven months of comprehensive development, the popular Unix software packaging tool RPM Package Manager (RPM) was released as stable version 5.0.0. The relaunch of the RPM project in spring 2007 and today's following availability of RPM 5 marks a major milestone for the previously rather Linux-centric RPM. RPM now finally evolved into a fully cross-platform and reusable software packaging tool.

What is new in RPM 5.0.0?

The Automake/Autoconf/Libtool-based build environment of RPM was completely revamped from scratch and as one major result mostly all third-party libraries now can be linked externally and in a very flexible way.

Support for the ancient and obsolete "rpmrc" files was completely removed, as everything is now configured through RPM "macros" under run-time only.

The RPM code base was ported to all major platforms, including the BSD, Linux, Solaris and Mac OS X Unix flavors and Windows/Cygwin.

The RPM packages, in addition to the default Gzip and optional Bzip2 compression, now support also LZMA compression.

Finally, support for the old RPMv3 (LSB) package format was removed to cleanup and simplify the code base. RPM 5, with respect to RPM format packages, now supports RPMv4 format only.

Additional features for use in package specifications (.spec files) were added, including new standard and even custom tags, new standard sections, etc. Most notably, RPM is now able to automatically track vendor distribution files with its new vcheck(1) based "%track" section and now can automatically download the vendor distribution files, too.

Download RPM v5.0

RPM 5.0 Project home page

So Who maintains RPM?

LWN has an interesting write up about RPM:

Once upon a time, RPM was the "Red Hat Package Manager." In a bid to establish RPM as a wider standard - and, perhaps, to get some development help - Red Hat tried to turn RPM into a community project - rebranding it as the "RPM Package Manager" in the process. But core RPM development remained at Red Hat, under the care of an employee named Jeff Johnson. That, it would seem, is where the trouble starts.