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How Windows Users are Changing Linux

Excellent article, I couldn't agree more with author. From the blog post:

My advice is to to speak up for Linux and promote unity in the Linux community. It is okay to have friendly rivalry between distros, but we need to guard against larger and more insidious forces attacking from the outside, and to protect that which we have in common. If Linux is going to change let it be from the inside out.

=> How Windows Users are Changing Linux and What We Should Do About It

Debian project today released a pair of security updates to plug at least ten security holes in its core called Linux kernel. Several vulnerabilities have been discovered in the Linux kernel that may lead to a denial of service or privilege escalation. This update has been rated as having important security impact.
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Informationweek tested openSUSE, Ubuntu 8.4, PCLinuxOS, Mandriva Linux One, Fedora, SimplyMEPIS, and CentOS 5.1. All performed well, and each had at least one truly outstanding feature. From the article:

In the last couple of years, desktop-friendly Linux distributions have taken enormous leaps -- they're easier to install, better maintained, and more powerful than ever before. There's also that many more of them -- which means that many more possibilities to sift through.

In this roundup I've looked at seven Linux distributions, all mainly aimed at desktop users. Some ought to be household names; some are less widely sung but still worth looking at. All are meant to be top-of-the-line, "throw-and-go" distros for general use, so I paid careful attention to how they behaved on a fairly broad range of hardware -- how display, networking, or other default configurations were set to behave both out of the box and after an update (if one was available).

Related: Which Linux Desktop Distribution is the best for me?