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dpkg-reconfigure_command

As I said earlier you need to tweak few things to run this monitor with Intel 810 or 845 based chip-set under Ubuntu Linux.

In order to use higher resolution install updated Intel i8xx, i9xx display driver. It is provided by a package called xserver-xorg-video-intel. This package provides the driver for the Intel i8xx and i9xx family of chipsets, including i810, i815, i830, i845, i855, i865, i915, and i945 series chips.

Replace driver by running the apt-get command. Open your terminal and type command:
$ sudo apt-get install xserver-xorg-video-intel

Now run ddcprobe command to get monitor VertRefresh values and HorizSync rate:
$ sudo ddcprobe | grep monitorrange
Output:

monitorrange: 24-82, 50-75

24-82 is your HorizSync rates and the second pair is your VertRefresh (50-75) values.

Next reconfigure xserver (X.org) video and monitor using auto detect feature:
$ sudo dpkg-reconfigure xserver-xorg

Set monitor resolution 1440 x 900 and others as per your requirement. Save the changes and reboot the system.

After login you can adjust screen resolution by visiting System > Preferences > Screen Resolution > Select desired screen resolution such as 1440 x 900 and save the changes.

Black Screen While Starting X window

My friend is new to Linux, everything was fine until he made some changes to X, which result into this problem. Now whenever he types command startx to start X he get a blank screen. Finally, he contacted me me via yahoo and asked me to get rid rid of this problem.

Step # 1: Reset blank X screen

First, get out of Blank screen by pressing combination of keys Ctrl+Alt+Backspace. If this fails, reboot system.

Step # 2: Reconfigure X server display

At shell, prompt type the following command to reconfigure X display.

If you are using Red Hat /Fedora / CentOS Linux type command:
# redhat-config-xfree86
If you are using Debian Linux type command:
# dpkg-reconfigure xserver-xfree86
OR login as the root user and type command:
# XFree86 -configure

Step # 3: Test new setup

Type startx to test your new settings:
# startx
OR if you used XFree86 –configure command to reconfigure X, then test it with following command:
# XFree86 -xf86config /etc/X11/XF86Config.new

See also:

Debian Linux: Allow non-root user to write CDs

If you wish to allow non-root users to write CDs, you must give them permissions to do so.

1) Give them permissions by setting SUID-root bit on cdrecord:
# dpkg-reconfigure cdrecord

2) Next you need to add your users to the cdrom group. New user rocky can be added as follows:
# adduser rocky

Once user added, add rocky to group cdrom:
# adduser rocky cdrom

3) Since cdrom group has write access to /dev/cdrom (/dev/hdc etc) and we have added user to cdrom group, rocky will be able to write cds.

4) Create an ISO file and write it:
$ mkisofs -v -o my.iso -R /home/rocky/mydata/
$ cdrecord -v -dev=ATA:1,0,0 speed=4 my.iso

Note as the root user you can mount an ISO file to modify or view its contains.

Related: Burning multi session CDs under Linux