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enhancements

Nice introduction to SELinux and other option to enhance Linux security. Mandatory access control and role-based access control are relatively new to the Linux kernel. With the introduction of the LSM framework, new security modules will certainly become available. In addition to enhancements to the framework, it's possible to stack security modules, allowing multiple security modules to coexist and provide maximum coverage for Linux's security needs. New access-control methods will also be introduced as research into operating system security continues. From the article:

Linux has been described as one of the most secure operating systems available, but the National Security Agency (NSA) has taken Linux to the next level with the introduction of Security-Enhanced Linux (SELinux). SELinux takes the existing GNU/Linux operating system and extends it with kernel and user-space modifications to make it bullet-proof. If you're running a 2.6 kernel today, you might be surprised to know that you're using SELinux right now! This article explores the ideas behind SELinux and how it's implemented.

=> Anatomy of Security-Enhanced Linux (SELinux) Architecture and implementation

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.2 Beta Released

RHEL 5.2 beta has been released. Red Hat engineers backport many of the new features from later kernels to the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 kernel, such as support for new hardware and virtualization enhancements. This provides Red Hat Enterprise Linux subscribers with important new capabilities while maintaining stable application interfaces -- so that applications continue to run after new updates are installed. And, of course, it’s always worth repeating that updates, which are released about twice a year, are included with every Red Hat Enterprise Linux subscription.

This will give our you a chance to see what your systems will be running later this year. You can grab beta version from RHN.

=> Press Release : Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.2 Beta