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executables

If you are a developer, you will re-use code provided by others. Usually /lib, /lib64, /usr/local/lib, and other directories stores various shared libraries. You can write your own program using these shared libraries. As a sys admin you need to manage and install these shared libraries. Use the following commands for shared libraries management, security, and debugging problems.
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How To Run Common GNU Utilities Under MS-Windows

Cygwin software offers Linux-like environment for Windows making it possible to port software running on POSIX systems (such as Linux, BSD, and Unix systems) to Windows. However, sometime you just wanna run bc or wget under Windows without going through Cygwin. Here are some ports of common GNU utilities to native Win32. In this context, native means the executables do only depend on the Microsoft C-runtime (msvcrt.dll) and not an emulation layer like that provided by Cygwin tools. A must download for die hard gnu folks working on windows systems :)

Tools included:

  • bc-1.05
  • bison-1.28
  • bzip2-1.0.2
  • diffutils-2.7
  • fileutils-3.16
  • findutils-4.1
  • flex-2.5.4
  • gawk-3.1.0
  • grep-2.4.2
  • gsar110
  • gzip-1.2.4
  • indent-2.2.9
  • jwhois-2.4.1
  • less-340
  • m4-1.4
  • make-3.78.1
  • patch-2.5
  • recode-3.6
  • rman-3.0.7
  • sed-3.02
  • shellutils-1.9.4
  • tar-1.12
  • textutils-2.1
  • unrar-3.00
  • wget-1.8.2
  • which-2.4

Download GNU utilities for Windows

=> Visit offical project to grab common GNU utilities for Windows [binary zip file 3.2M] (Outdated link)
=> Please download latest and updated GNU utilities from GNUWin32 project [thanks Kurt]

Updated for accuracy.

Under Linux / UNIX it is very easy to find out all running services and shutdown unwanted services. All you have to do it go through the following directories or configuration files:
=> /etc/init.d/
=> /etc/rcX.d/
=> /etc/xinetd./d
=> /etc/inetd.conf
=> /usr/local/etc/rc.d

You can also use tools such as CentOS / RHEL ntsysv tool / Debian / Ubuntu service configuration tool. Ultimately, netstat command always displays a list of all open ports:
# netstat -tulpn

Controlling Services under MS Windows Server

Shutting down services under Windows Vista or Server 2003 is not straightforward. Microsoft allows different ways to start an application at system startup or user login which results into a true messy system. MSConfig utility bundled with Windows Me and XP does a good job but it is not sufficient. There is a nice utility called Autorun:

This utility, which has the most comprehensive knowledge of auto-starting locations of any startup monitor, shows you what programs are configured to run during system bootup or login, and shows you the entries in the order Windows processes them. These programs include ones in your startup folder, Run, RunOnce, and other Registry keys. You can configure Autoruns to show other locations, including Explorer shell extensions, toolbars, browser helper objects, Winlogon notifications, auto-start services, and much more. Autoruns goes way beyond the MSConfig utility bundled with Windows Me and XP.

Autoruns' Hide Signed Microsoft Entries option helps you to zoom in on third-party auto-starting images that have been added to your system and it has support for looking at the auto-starting images configured for other accounts configured on a system. Also included in the download package is a command-line equivalent that can output in CSV format, Autorunsc.

Use autoruns utility to manage all startup programs under Windows. You'll probably be surprised at how many executables are launched automatically!

Windows Server 2003 / 2008 / XP / Vista - Autoruns to control Services
(Fig. 01: Autoruns in Action)

While administrating a box, you may wanted to find out what a processes is doing and find out how many file descriptors (fd) are being used. You will surprised to find out that process does open all sort of files:
=> Actual log file

=> /dev files

=> UNIX Sockets

=> Network sockets

=> Library files /lib /lib64

=> Executables and other programs etc

In this quick post, I will explain how to to count how many file descriptors are currently in use on your Linux server system.
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