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Debian project today released a pair of security updates to plug at least ten security holes in its core called Linux kernel. Several vulnerabilities have been discovered in the Linux kernel that may lead to a denial of service or privilege escalation. This update has been rated as having important security impact.
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Linux file systems have a number of limitations that make them a poor choice for large and high-performance computing environments. This article explains some of the pros and cons of Linux and old UNIX file systems:

I am frequently asked by potential customers with high I/O requirements if they can use Linux instead of AIX or Solaris.

No one ever asks me about high-performance I/O -- high IOPS (define) or high streaming I/O -- on Windows or NTFS because it isn't possible. Windows and the NTFS file system, which hasn't changed much since it was released almost 10 years ago, can't scale given its current structure. The NTFS file system layout, allocation methodology and structure do not allow it to efficiently support multi-terabyte file systems, much less file systems in the petabyte range, and that's no surprise since it's not Microsoft's target market.

=> Linux File Systems: You Get What You Pay For

What do you think?

/proc/filesystems is the file used to detect filesystems supported by running kernel. You can quickly run grep or cat command to display the list of all supported file system. nodev indicates that the file system is not associated with a physical device such as /dev/sdb1. If you see ext3 or vfat, it means you will be able to mount ext3 and vfat based file systems.

Following cat command will quickly tell you what filesystems supported by currently running Linux kernel:

$ cat /proc/filesystems
Output:

nodev   sysfs
nodev   rootfs
nodev   proc
nodev   usbfs
        ext3
        vfat
....

For example, if the iso9660 fllesystem not listed, you can not mount standard CD-ROM file system. To add support simply recompile kernel with iso9660 filesystem support.