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Linux Convert ext3 to ext4 File system

Some time ago ext4 was released and available for Linux kernel. ext4 provides some additional benefits and perforce over ext3 file system. You can easily convert ext3 to ext4 file system. The next release of Fedora, 11, will default to the ext4 file system unless serious regressions are seen. In this quick tutorial you will learn about converting ext3 to ext4 file system.
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Download of the day: Linux Kernel 2.6.28

Linux kernel version 2.6.28 has been released and available for download. The new version includes following stable and new features:

a] ext4 file system - The ext4 filesystem can support volumes with sizes up to 1 exbibyte and files with sizes up to 16 TiB. ext4 removes ext3 64-bit storage limits and adds other performance improvements.

b] Graphics Execution Manager (GEM) - It is a a modern memory manager specialized for use in device drivers for graphics chipsets. It manages graphics memory, controls the execution context and manages the Non-Uniform Memory Access (NUMA) environment on modern graphics chipsets. The "xf86-video-intel" device driver will feature GEM integration.

c] Other features - Stable USB drivers, KVM, bug fixes and other stuff.

=> Download Linux kernel 2.6.28 here. You may also find our kernel compile tutorial useful.

Linux File System Limitations For High Performance Computing

Linux file systems have a number of limitations that make them a poor choice for large and high-performance computing environments. This article explains some of the pros and cons of Linux and old UNIX file systems:

I am frequently asked by potential customers with high I/O requirements if they can use Linux instead of AIX or Solaris.

No one ever asks me about high-performance I/O -- high IOPS (define) or high streaming I/O -- on Windows or NTFS because it isn't possible. Windows and the NTFS file system, which hasn't changed much since it was released almost 10 years ago, can't scale given its current structure. The NTFS file system layout, allocation methodology and structure do not allow it to efficiently support multi-terabyte file systems, much less file systems in the petabyte range, and that's no surprise since it's not Microsoft's target market.

=> Linux File Systems: You Get What You Pay For

What do you think?

Comparison: Linux and UNIX ~ ZFS vs XFS vs EXT4 filesystem

This is an interesting filesystem comparison. If you are looking to build cheap storage for personal use file system decision is quite important:

This is my attempt to cut through the hype and uncertainty to find a storage subsystem that works. I compared XFS and EXT4 under Linux with ZFS under OpenSolaris. Aside from the different kernels and filesystems, I tested internal and external journal devices and software and hardware RAIDs. Software RAIDs are "raid-10 near2" with 6 disks on Linux. On Solaris the zpool is created with three mirrors of two disks each. Hardware RAIDs use the Areca's RAID-10 for both Linux and Solaris. Drive caches are disabled throughout, but the battery-backed cache on the controller is enabled when using hardware RAID.

=> ZFS, XFS, and EXT4 filesystems compared

Repairing Linux ext2 or ext3 or ext4 File System [ fsck ]

Linux comes with the system utility fsck ("file system check") for checking the consistency of a file system. This quick post explains how to use fsck to fix error.
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