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Most Linux distro can not display multilingual text on the console / shell prompt by default. There is a small hack which allows you to display other languages such as Hindi, Chinese, Korean, Japanese etc text on the prompt.

You need to use the bterm application, which is a terminal emulator that displays to a Linux frame buffer. It is able to display Unicode text on the console.

First, enable framebuffer by editing grub.conf file, enter:
# vi /etc/grub.conf
or
# vi /boot/grub/menu.lst
Find kernel line and append "vga=0x317" parameter:
kernel /vmlinuz-2.6.18-92.1.1.el5 ro root=LABEL=/ console=tty0 console=ttyS1,19200n8 vga=0x317
Save and close the file. Next, you need to install bterm - a unicode capable terminal program for the Linux frame buffer. Type the following command to install it under Fedora / RHEL / Cent OS Linux, enter:
# yum install bogl-bterm
If you are using Debian / Ubuntu Linux, enter:
$ sudo apt-get install bogl-bterm
Now reboot your Linux desktop / workstation so that kernel can create /dev/fb0. To use multilingual text on the console, type the command bterm, enter:
$ /usr/bin/bterm

Recommended Readings:

Today, at the Red Hat Summit in Boston, Mass., Red Hat introduced Project Spacewalk. RHN has provided patches and software for Red Hat Enterprise Linux operating system. Spacewalk is an open source (GPLv2) Linux systems management solution. It is the upstream community project from which the Red Hat Network Satellite product is derived. From the press release:

Spacewalk is the upstream project upon which RHN Satellite will now be based. Spacewalk will work with Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Fedora and other Red Hat Enterprise Linux derivative distributions like CentOS and Scientific Linux. Spacewalk will bring together a growing community of new users along with seasoned systems management veterans. In this way, the Satellite product can grow (as Linux itself does) with the combined efforts of the open source leader, Red Hat, and an invigorated community. Both will work together to expand the capabilities and stature of the upstream project. This will translate into faster adoption of new, innovative ideas and technologies into the downstream Satellite product.


(Fig.01: Spacewalk in action)

=> You can download spacewalk software here.

Oracle Linux now joined Fedora, Ubuntu, and Solaris for giving out free CDs. You can now request your FREE Oracle Unbreakable Linux 2-disc (DVD) Kit from official oracle site.

=> Visit oracle site to grab free CD kit [ direct link ].

Run Linux From USB Flash / Pen Drive

If you wanna run Linux any time, any place, any computer, try USB device. Here's what to do with popular distributions like Puppy Linux, Ubuntu, and Fedora, so you can boot up directly from your thumb drive:

Most of the time, Linux is run from either an installation on a hard drive or a live CD/DVD distribution. The first is fast, but not very portable; the second can be run anywhere you have a computer and a CD drive with boot access, but typically isn't very fast. Over the last few years, though, we've seen the emergence of something that combines the speed of a hard drive install with the convenience of a live CD: running Linux from a USB flash drive.

=> How To Run Linux From A USB Flash Drive

Informationweek tested openSUSE, Ubuntu 8.4, PCLinuxOS, Mandriva Linux One, Fedora, SimplyMEPIS, and CentOS 5.1. All performed well, and each had at least one truly outstanding feature. From the article:

In the last couple of years, desktop-friendly Linux distributions have taken enormous leaps -- they're easier to install, better maintained, and more powerful than ever before. There's also that many more of them -- which means that many more possibilities to sift through.

In this roundup I've looked at seven Linux distributions, all mainly aimed at desktop users. Some ought to be household names; some are less widely sung but still worth looking at. All are meant to be top-of-the-line, "throw-and-go" distros for general use, so I paid careful attention to how they behaved on a fairly broad range of hardware -- how display, networking, or other default configurations were set to behave both out of the box and after an update (if one was available).

Related: Which Linux Desktop Distribution is the best for me?

Canonical Ltd. and Red Hat, Inc. today announced the inclusion of OpenJDK-based implementations in Fedora 9 and Ubuntu 8.04 Long Term Support (LTS) Server and Desktop editions, furthering the promise of Sun's open source Java technology initiative.

In addition, the NetBeans 6.0 Integrated Development Environment (IDE) () is being delivered as part of the Ubuntu 8.04 LTS release and Canonical has certified Ubuntu 8.04 LTS Server Edition on several Sun x86 systems.

Sun Press Release : Open Source Java Technology Debuts In GNU/Linux Distributions

Sun Looks To Open Source The Rest of Java

Sun is planning to remove the last reaming restrictions on Java to make it completely open source.

By freeing these up, Java can be fully open-source and thus be packaged more easily with Linux distributions. In conjunction with this activity, Sun is talking with Linux distributors, including OpenSuse, Ubuntu and Fedora to have them offer an updated version of OpenJDK, which constitutes the open-source Java platform. Sun plans to offer the updated OpenJDK soon and clear the last few encumbrances later.

=> Sun looks to free up the rest of Java