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file formats

OpenOffice 3.0 beta has been released and available for download. With Version 3.0, OpenOffice.org is now able to run on Mac OS X without the need for X11. Thus, OpenOffice.org behaves like any other Aqua application. OpenOffice.org 3.0 already supports the features of the upcoming version 1.2 of the ISO standard OpenDocument Format (ODF). In addition to read and write support for the Microsoft Office binary file formats (.doc; .xls, .ppt, etc.), OpenOffice.org 3.0 is now capable of opening files created with Microsoft Office 2007 or Microsoft Office 2008 for Mac OS X (.docx, .xlsx, .pptx, etc.).

=> You can download latest version here

Linux Illegal Codecs and adoption problem

So Do Illegal codecs (shady definition [1]) scare you as a Linux user? According to Adrian Kingsley-Hughes:

... I’m especially interested in rolling out Ubuntu onto older PCs and notebooks where installing Windows will put too much of a strain on the hardware. But there’s one aspect of Ubuntu, and Linux in general for that matter, that’s putting me off. This is the fact that to play a DVD or use WMA/WMV files I have to install codecs that are technically illegal to use.

Linux has a number of really strong points that go beyond the price (reliability, ease of use and low hardware requirements to name but a few), but the operating system falls short when it comes to legally supporting file formats such as MP3, WMA/WMV and DVDs. It’s not that you don’t have support for these formats available, it’s that adding support means entering into some really shady legal territory...

A good question, what do you think? Should patent holder care more about codecs or all downloaded music / mp3 and other formats? One can convert his / her collection to open formats. Luckily in my country there is no such stupid law exists.

Illegal Codecs Put Me Off Linux (via /.)

[1] In many countries (outside USA) codecs are not illegal.