Gnome

Ubuntu Linux (a GNU/Linux-based computer operating system) version 11.10 has been released and available for download. The new release includes some enhancements to make your experience even more enjoyable. The Default user interface is set to unity shell on top of GNOME 3.x. However, you will get a 2D version of Unity as a fallback for systems that lack the hardware resources for the 3D version. The good news is you will be able to install the entire GNOME 3 desktop along with GNOME Shell directly from the Ubuntu repos.

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Our FAQ section is updated in last few days with new howtos:

  1. Linux Find Out CPU Architecture Information
  2. Gnome Network Manager VPN Tab Disabled ( Greyed out )
  3. Gnome Volume Control: Disabled Sound Themes
  4. Debian Linux (Squeeze) Install Firefox 4
  5. UNIX: Find Out the Server Model
  6. Linux / UNIX: Run Command a Number of Times In a Row
  7. Linux: TMOUT To Automatically Log Users Out
  8. RHEL 6: Change OpenSSH Port To 1255 ( SELinux Config )
  9. RHEL 6: semanage SELinux Command Not Found
  10. HowTo: UNIX Set Date and Time Command

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The latest version of the popular Linux desktop distribution Ubuntu 9.10 has been released and available from the official project web site. New features since Ubuntu 9.04 includes – Firefox 3.5, GNOME 2.28, an enforcing AppArmor profile, Linux kernel 2.6.31, ext4 file system (default), Empathy instant messenger instead of Pidgin, the Ubuntu One client, which interfaces with Canonical’s new on-line storage system. It also includes a new application called the Ubuntu Software Center. A quick screen-shot tour of new features available here on our website.

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OpenBSD 4.6 has been released and available for download from the official website. OpenBSD is well known for record of more than ten years with only two remote holes in the default install. The OpenBSD is widely known for the quality open source code and documentation, uncompromising position on software licensing, and focus on security and code correctness.

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I haven’t had to use MS-Office / word in years and I have never had a problem with awesome OpenOffice.org software. I have been using it in Linux for a long time, and recently at work we started using it in windows-xp systems too. I have also got a couple other people in my school, work and small business to use it as well. This tutorial explains the approach you take when you want to print labels under Ubuntu Linux using gLabels. It is a label, business and media cover designer for the GNOME. The intuitive editor allows to create text fields, insert images, simple objects, and create barcodes. It is designed to work with common laser/inkjet printers peel-off label and business card sheets. From the article:

Ubuntu has no shortages of software for printing labels. Many users content themselves with the label and mail merge features in OpenOffice.org Writer or in Abiword or KOffice. All these solutions will do a basic job, especially with text. But what if you want elaborate formatting or graphics with your labels? What if you want a smaller, dedicated program that is quicker to load than a complete word processor? In these cases, you should consider turning to gLabels instead.

=> Printing Labels in Ubuntu

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Is Linux is virus free? The author of foobar blog provides some insight about the same. Linux users can’t just catch a virus by email or downloading malware from the Internet, contrary to “those Windows users”. From the foobar blog post:

Then you save an email attachment under Linux, the execute flag is normally NOT set and thus, the file can’t be executed just by clicking on it. So, no luck?

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Canonical the makers of Ubuntu about to introduce a new desktop notification system proposal. New changes should improve the usability of the Linux desktop including desktop notification system for both GNOME and KDE. From the Mark Shuttleworth blog:

The key proposals we are making are that:

* There should be no actions on notifications.

* Notifications should not be displayed synchronously, but may be queued. Our implementation of the notification display daemon will display only one notification at a time, others may do it differently.

That’s pretty much it. There are some subtleties and variations, but these are the key changes we are proposing, and which we will explore in a netbook device with a partner, as well as in the general Ubuntu 9.04 release, schedule gods being willing.

I think new changes looks more like Growl system used in Mac OS X. You can read more about proposal including mockup video that shows new notification system here.

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