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For the first time, court lays down a legal foundation for the protection of open source developers. This means now all open source licenses are enforceable. From the article:

An appeals court has erased most of the doubt around Open Source licensing, permanently, in a decision that was extremely favorable toward projects like GNU, Creative Commons, Wikipedia, and Linux. The man who prompted that decision could be described as the worst enemy a Free Software project could have. This is the story of how our community was able to benefit from that enemy.

For a decade there'd been questions: Are Open Source licenses enforceable at all? Are their terms, calling for a patent detente or disclosure of source code, legal?

=> Bruce Perens: A Big Change for Open Source (via ./)

You may find Software Freedom Law Center web site useful. It provide legal representation and other law-related services to protect and advance Free and Open Source Software (FOSS). The Center now represents many of the most important and well-established free software and open source projects.

Happy Birthday To GNU

GNU is a computer operating system composed entirely of free software. According to wikipedia:

The plan for the GNU operating system was publicly announced on September 27, 1983, on the net.unix-wizards and net.usoft newsgroups by Richard Stallman. Software development began on January 5, 1984, when Stallman quit his job at Massachusetts Institute of Technology so that they could not claim ownership or interfere with distributing GNU as free software.

FSF has started its month long celebration of the anniversary by publishing Happy Birthday to GNU film:

(Video.01: Freedom Fry — "Happy birthday to GNU" - short film by Stephen Fry)

I am looking forward to another 25 years!

Sun is planning to release OpenSolaris soon with better package management, GNU userland tools and fast release cycle just like Fedora or Ubuntu Linux. Sun's Ian Murdock gave a presentation about OpenSolaris at LugRadio Live this past weekend. He explained how OpenSolaris reflects Sun's changing platform strategy and also discussed some of the technical attributes that differentiate OpenSolaris from Linux.

The first steps towards this goal have been realized in the latest developer preview release of OpenSolaris which offers a complete GNOME desktop environment as well as a package system and an installer. The final release will take place in May and the distribution will adhere to a six-month release cycle, just like Fedora and Ubuntu.

Few suggestion...

  • Get Gnome desktop instead of Sun branded Java desktop. Please keep your corporate color away from my desktop.
  • Currently OpenSolaris does not support virtual console
  • Get complete package collection; I want something like FreeBSD ports or GNU/Debian APT repos.
  • Get pulse-audio or may be ALSA sound support

=> Sun touts big plans for OpenSolaris as first release nears

How To Run Common GNU Utilities Under MS-Windows

Cygwin software offers Linux-like environment for Windows making it possible to port software running on POSIX systems (such as Linux, BSD, and Unix systems) to Windows. However, sometime you just wanna run bc or wget under Windows without going through Cygwin. Here are some ports of common GNU utilities to native Win32. In this context, native means the executables do only depend on the Microsoft C-runtime (msvcrt.dll) and not an emulation layer like that provided by Cygwin tools. A must download for die hard gnu folks working on windows systems :)

Tools included:

  • bc-1.05
  • bison-1.28
  • bzip2-1.0.2
  • diffutils-2.7
  • fileutils-3.16
  • findutils-4.1
  • flex-2.5.4
  • gawk-3.1.0
  • grep-2.4.2
  • gsar110
  • gzip-1.2.4
  • indent-2.2.9
  • jwhois-2.4.1
  • less-340
  • m4-1.4
  • make-3.78.1
  • patch-2.5
  • recode-3.6
  • rman-3.0.7
  • sed-3.02
  • shellutils-1.9.4
  • tar-1.12
  • textutils-2.1
  • unrar-3.00
  • wget-1.8.2
  • which-2.4

Download GNU utilities for Windows

=> Visit offical project to grab common GNU utilities for Windows [binary zip file 3.2M] (Outdated link)
=> Please download latest and updated GNU utilities from GNUWin32 project [thanks Kurt]

Updated for accuracy.

Qt To Be Licensed Under GPL version 3

Qt is the standard framework for high performance, cross-platform application development. Trolltech ASA is licensing its Qt cross-platform development framework under the GNU General Public License version 3 (GPL v3), with immediate effect. GNU founder Richard Stallman said:

I am very pleased that Trolltech has decided to make Qt avaliable under GPL v3. This will allow parts of KDE to adopt GPL v3 too. Even better, Trolltech has made provisions for a smooth migration to future GPL versions if it approves of them.

Qt is already available under the GPL v2 and will continue to be so in addition to the GPL v3.

The GPL v3 license will make it easy and safe for free software developers to use Trolltech's Qt with the most recent license framework from the Free Software Foundation. Trolltech hopes that its move will inspire free software projects to use GPL v3 when programming with Qt.

Trolltech to adopt GPL 3 for Qt

Humor: OSS and Apple Fan boys rejoice

This is sooo funny. Apple released its iPhone and GNU released its GPL v3... what about Microsoft geeks?

(click to enlarge)

Source / Image credit

When invoked without arguments, the date command displays the current date and time. Depending on the options specified, date will set the date and time or print it in a user defined way. I've seen many sysadmin writing perl scripts for calculating relative date such as yesterdays or tomorrows day. You can use GNU date command, which is designed to handle relative date calculation such as:

  • 1 Year
  • 2 Days
  • 2 Days ago
  • 5 Years

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