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Red hat issued update for NSPR and NSS packages that fix a bug and add an enhancement are now
available for download via RHN for RHEL 5.x systems.

Network Security Services (NSS) is a set of libraries designed to support cross-platform development of security-enabled client and server applications. Applications built with NSS can support SSL v2 and v3, TLS, PKCS #5, PKCS #7, PKCS #11, PKCS #12, S/MIME, X.509

NSPR provides platform independence for non-GUI operating system facilities. These facilities include threads, thread synchronization, normal file and network I/O, interval timing and calendar time, basic
memory management (malloc and free) and shared library linking.

The program would hang when using the batch processing feature of the certutil tool. These packages fix this issue so that the program does not hang when using the batch processing feature of the certutil tool.

These updated packages provide base and cryptography services required by Mozilla Firefox 3.

How do I update my system?

Before applying this update, make sure that all previously-released errata relevant to your system have been applied. Simply login as root and type the following command:
# yum update
Sample output:

Loading "rhnplugin" plugin
Loading "security" plugin
rhel-x86_64-server-vt-5   100% |=========================| 1.2 kB    00:00
rhel-x86_64-server-5      100% |=========================| 1.2 kB    00:00
Skipping security plugin, no data
Setting up Update Process
Resolving Dependencies
Skipping security plugin, no data
--> Running transaction check
---> Package yelp.x86_64 0:2.16.0-19.el5 set to be updated
---> Package nspr.i386 0:4.7.1-1.el5 set to be updated
---> Package nspr.x86_64 0:4.7.1-1.el5 set to be updated
---> Package nss.i386 0:3.12.0.3-1.el5 set to be updated
---> Package nss-tools.x86_64 0:3.12.0.3-1.el5 set to be updated
---> Package nss.x86_64 0:3.12.0.3-1.el5 set to be updated
---> Package xulrunner.x86_64 0:1.9-1.el5 set to be updated
--> Finished Dependency Resolution
Dependencies Resolved
=============================================================================
 Package                 Arch       Version          Repository        Size
=============================================================================
Updating:
 nspr                    i386       4.7.1-1.el5      rhel-x86_64-server-5  119 k
 nspr                    x86_64     4.7.1-1.el5      rhel-x86_64-server-5  117 k
 nss                     i386       3.12.0.3-1.el5   rhel-x86_64-server-5  1.1 M
 nss                     x86_64     3.12.0.3-1.el5   rhel-x86_64-server-5  1.1 M
 nss-tools               x86_64     3.12.0.3-1.el5   rhel-x86_64-server-5  2.2 M
 xulrunner               x86_64     1.9-1.el5        rhel-x86_64-server-5   10 M
 yelp                    x86_64     2.16.0-19.el5    rhel-x86_64-server-5  583 k
Transaction Summary
=============================================================================
Install      0 Package(s)
Update       7 Package(s)
Remove       0 Package(s)
Total download size: 16 M
Is this ok [y/N]: y
Downloading Packages:
(1/7): xulrunner-1.9-1.el 100% |=========================|  10 MB    00:09
(2/7): nss-3.12.0.3-1.el5 100% |=========================| 1.1 MB    00:00
(3/7): nss-tools-3.12.0.3 100% |=========================| 2.2 MB    00:02
(4/7): nss-3.12.0.3-1.el5 100% |=========================| 1.1 MB    00:00
(5/7): nspr-4.7.1-1.el5.x 100% |=========================| 117 kB    00:00
(6/7): nspr-4.7.1-1.el5.i 100% |=========================| 119 kB    00:00
(7/7): yelp-2.16.0-19.el5 100% |=========================| 583 kB    00:00
Running rpm_check_debug
Running Transaction Test
Finished Transaction Test
Transaction Test Succeeded
Running Transaction
  Updating  : nspr                         ####################### [ 1/14]
  Updating  : nss                          ####################### [ 2/14]
  Updating  : xulrunner                    ####################### [ 3/14]
  Updating  : nspr                         ####################### [ 4/14]
  Updating  : yelp                         ####################### [ 5/14]
  Updating  : nss-tools                    ####################### [ 6/14]
  Updating  : nss                          ####################### [ 7/14]
warning: /etc/pki/nssdb/cert8.db created as /etc/pki/nssdb/cert8.db.rpmnew
warning: /etc/pki/nssdb/key3.db created as /etc/pki/nssdb/key3.db.rpmnew
  Cleanup   : yelp                         ####################### [ 8/14]
  Cleanup   : nspr                         ####################### [ 9/14]
  Cleanup   : nspr                         ####################### [10/14]
  Cleanup   : nss                          ####################### [11/14]
  Cleanup   : nss-tools                    ####################### [12/14]
  Cleanup   : nss                          ####################### [13/14]
  Cleanup   : xulrunner                    ####################### [14/14]
Updated: nspr.i386 0:4.7.1-1.el5 nspr.x86_64 0:4.7.1-1.el5 nss.i386 0:3.12.0.3-1.el5 nss.x86_64 0:3.12.0.3-1.el5 nss-tools.x86_64 0:3.12.0.3-1.el5 xulrunner.x86_64 0:1.9-1.el5 yelp.x86_64 0:2.16.0-19.el5
Complete!

RPM 5.0.0 has been released.

RPM Package Manager is a software package manager for UNIX and Linux distribution. It is a powerful and command-line package management system capable of installing, uninstalling, verifying, querying, and updating Unix binary / source software packages. RPM was originally written in 1997 by Erik Troan and Marc Ewing for use in the Red Hat Linux distribution. These you can use RPM under many Linux distribution and various UNIX variant such as AIX / OpenSolaris etc. From the press release:

After seven months of comprehensive development, the popular Unix software packaging tool RPM Package Manager (RPM) was released as stable version 5.0.0. The relaunch of the RPM project in spring 2007 and today's following availability of RPM 5 marks a major milestone for the previously rather Linux-centric RPM. RPM now finally evolved into a fully cross-platform and reusable software packaging tool.

What is new in RPM 5.0.0?

The Automake/Autoconf/Libtool-based build environment of RPM was completely revamped from scratch and as one major result mostly all third-party libraries now can be linked externally and in a very flexible way.

Support for the ancient and obsolete "rpmrc" files was completely removed, as everything is now configured through RPM "macros" under run-time only.

The RPM code base was ported to all major platforms, including the BSD, Linux, Solaris and Mac OS X Unix flavors and Windows/Cygwin.

The RPM packages, in addition to the default Gzip and optional Bzip2 compression, now support also LZMA compression.

Finally, support for the old RPMv3 (LSB) package format was removed to cleanup and simplify the code base. RPM 5, with respect to RPM format packages, now supports RPMv4 format only.

Additional features for use in package specifications (.spec files) were added, including new standard and even custom tags, new standard sections, etc. Most notably, RPM is now able to automatically track vendor distribution files with its new vcheck(1) based "%track" section and now can automatically download the vendor distribution files, too.

Download RPM v5.0

RPM 5.0 Project home page

So Who maintains RPM?

LWN has an interesting write up about RPM:

Once upon a time, RPM was the "Red Hat Package Manager." In a bid to establish RPM as a wider standard - and, perhaps, to get some development help - Red Hat tried to turn RPM into a community project - rebranding it as the "RPM Package Manager" in the process. But core RPM development remained at Red Hat, under the care of an employee named Jeff Johnson. That, it would seem, is where the trouble starts.