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Download of the day: OpenBSD 4.2 CD ISO Image

OpenBSD 4.2 has been released and available for download. OpenBSD is famous for its focus on security. Today, November 1st, the team is proud to announce Release 4.2.

Even though security is still there, this release comes with some amazing performance improvements: basic benchmarks showed PF being twice as fast, a rewrite of the TLB shootdown code for i386 and amd64 cut the time to do a full package build by 20 percent (mostly because all the forks in configure scripts have become much cheaper), and the improved frequency scaling on MP systems can help save nearly 20 percent of battery power.

And then the new features: FFS2, support for the Advanced Host Controller Interface, IP balancing in CARP, layer 7 manipulation with hoststated, Xenocara, and more!

Download OpenBSD ISO

=> For greater convenience, the new 4.2 release also comes with roughly ~200MB full install ISO images called "install42.iso". If you download this file, you do not need the other standard install files. Select

Also, Federico Biancuzzi interviewed 23 developers and assembled this huge interview...

Run wget In Background For an Unattended Download of Files on a Linux and Unix

Here is a quick tip, if you wish to perform an unattended download of large files such as a Linux DVD ISO image file use the wget command.
[click to continue…]

Howto Setup yum repositories to update or install package from ISO CDROM Image

yum (Yellow dog Updater Modified) is a package manager for RPM compatible Linux systems such as CentOS, Fedora core and latest Redhat Enterprise Linux.

So how do you use yum to update / install packages from an ISO of CentOS / FC / RHEL CD?

Creation of yum repositories is handled by a separate tool called createrepo, which generates the necessary XML metadata. If you have a slow internet connection or collection of all downloaded ISO images, use this hack to install rpms from iso images.

Step # 1: Mount an ISO file

Type the following command (replace iso file name with the actual iso file):
# yum install createrepo
# mkdir -p /mnt/iso/{1,2,3}
# mount -o loop /path/to/centos1.iso /mnt/iso/1

Step # 2: Create a repository

Use createrepo to generate the necessary XML metadata. Type the following commands:
# cd /mnt/iso
# createrepo .

Clean repo, enter:
# yum clean all

Step # 3: Create config file

You need to create a repo config file in /etc/yum.repos.d/ directory.
# vi /etc/yum.repos.d/iso.repo
Append following text:
[My ISO Repository]

Save and close the changes.

Now use yum command to install packages from ISO images:
# yum install package-name

Download of the day: AcetoneISO – extract, browse ISO and other CD/DVD formats under Linux

AcetoneISO is the disk image emulator that mounts images of DVD and CD media. Both Mac OS X and Linux / other UNIX like oses can mount and use ISO images using loopback device. It is a DAEMON Tools (Microsoft Windows disk image) clone / emulator program with a lot more features.

Using this cool open source software means a user does not have to swap discs to run different programs on local or network computer. You can access software distributed (over Internet) as a disk image such as ISO, DAA, BIN or many other formats (no need to burn a CD/DVD to use disk image). Other usage:

  • Prevent scratching, which can cause permanent damage to a disc
  • Speeds up access times as hard drives are faster than optical drives
  • Provides a backup copy of a disc, in case the original becomes damaged, lost, or stolen


  • Mount and Unmount ISO, MDF, NRG (if iso-9660 standard)
  • Burn Your ISO, CUE, TOC images directly in K3b
  • Blank Your CD/DVD ReWritable
  • Verify md5sum of image files and Generate a Md5sum file from ISO
  • Ability to create ISO from Folder and CD/DVD
  • Service-Menu support
  • Play a DVD-Movie ISO with Kaffeine, Mplayer, VLC, Kmplayer
  • Split ISOs in smaller files and Merge them
  • Quick Turbo Mount an ISO file from your Desktop
  • Compress ISO with p7zip and extract
  • Encrypt and Decrypt an ISO
  • Generate a CUE file from a IMG/BIN image
  • Rip a PSX cd to a bin/toc image

AcetoneISO has only one dependencies problem - Kommander. Make sure you have Kommander installed.

Step # 1: Install kommander

Use apt-get command to install kommander ( it consists of an editor and a program executor that produce dialogs that you can execute), which is required by AcetoneISO. You also need p7zip (a file archiver with highest compression ratio) to compress and extract ISO images. Use apt-get command under Debian or Ubuntu Linux as follows:
# apt-get install kommander p7zip
$ sudo apt-get install kommander p7zip

Step # 2: Install AcetoneISO

Download source code or Debian .deb or Suse/Redhat RPM file from official website. Use apt-get / rpm command. Use apt-get command to install .deb file:
# apt-get install AcetoneISO-6.7.deb
OR use rpm package for RPM based distro:
# rpm -ivh AcetoneISO-6.7.noarch.rpm

Step # 2: Start AcetoneISO program

Simply type the command or click on Application > Accessories > AcetoneISO:
$ acetoneiso &
AcetoneISO - extract, browse ISO and other CD/DVD formats under Linux


Debian Linux: Allow non-root user to write CDs

If you wish to allow non-root users to write CDs, you must give them permissions to do so.

1) Give them permissions by setting SUID-root bit on cdrecord:
# dpkg-reconfigure cdrecord

2) Next you need to add your users to the cdrom group. New user rocky can be added as follows:
# adduser rocky

Once user added, add rocky to group cdrom:
# adduser rocky cdrom

3) Since cdrom group has write access to /dev/cdrom (/dev/hdc etc) and we have added user to cdrom group, rocky will be able to write cds.

4) Create an ISO file and write it:
$ mkisofs -v -o my.iso -R /home/rocky/mydata/
$ cdrecord -v -dev=ATA:1,0,0 speed=4 my.iso

Note as the root user you can mount an ISO file to modify or view its contains.

Related: Burning multi session CDs under Linux

How to: Extract files from ISO CD images in Linux

Under many situations you may need to get a single file/many files from Linux ISO image.

You can mount ISO images via the loop device. You need to use mount command. First login as a root user:

Extract File(s) Under Linux OS

Let us assume that your ISO image name is disk1.iso.

Step # 1: First you need to create a directory /mnt/iso

# mkdir /mnt/iso
# mount -o loop disk1.iso /mnt/iso

Step # 3: Extract file

Now you can easily copy file called file.txt from iso disk image to /tmp directory :

# cd /mnt/iso
# cp file.txt /tmp

Step # 4: Copy foo.rpm from ISO disk image:

# cd /mnt/iso/RedHat/RPMS
# cp foo.rpm /tmp 

Extract File(s) Under Windows XP or Vista Os

Windows do not have in built capability as provided by Linux to extract file. Luckly many third party software exist my favorite is Winimage http://www.winimage.com/. Download trial version (I’m sure you will love to registered this tiny utility later):

1) Install Winimage software

2) Just double click on Linux ISO file

3) Select the desired file and hit CTRL + X (or from Image menu select extract)

For more information read man pages:

man cp
man mv
man rpm
man mount
man mkdir