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Web server that use threaded processes such as Apache and others can be targeted using interesting HTTP DoS tool that has been released in wild. Tool can eat up all resources while it holds the connection open to server and keep sending incomplete HTTP requests. End result Apache run out of memory and comes under DoS attack.
[click to continue…]

Nice short guide for writing a kernel module for FreeBSD operating system. From the article:

FreeBSD 7.0 has already been released. If you are a real hacker, the best way to jump in and learn it is hacking together an introductory kernel module. In this article I’ll implement a very basic module that prints a message when it is loaded, and another when it is unloaded. I’ll also cover the mechanics of compiling our module using standard tools and rebuilding the stock FreeBSD kernel.

=> Writing a kernel module for FreeBSD

Related: How To Compile a Linux Kernel Modules

The stap program is the front-end to the Systemtap tool. It accepts probing instructions (written in a simple scripting language), translates those instructions into C code, compiles this C code, and loads the resulting kernel module into a running Linux kernel to perform the requested system trace/probe functions.

SystemTap provides free software (GPL) infrastructure to simplify the gathering of information about the running Linux system. This assists diagnosis of a performance or functional problem. SystemTap eliminates the need for the developer to go through the tedious and disruptive instrument, recompile, install, and reboot sequence that may be otherwise required to collect data.

We have several developers who use stap. Usually it works out of box. For example following program prints hello world on screen if SystemTap and related packages are installed:

stap -e 'probe begin { log ("hello world") }'

However under CentOS Linux version 5 (RHEL 5), you will get an error as follows:

semantic error: libdwfl failure (dwfl_linux_kernel_report_offline): No such file or directory while resolving probe point kernel.function("sys_*")

Install kernel-debuginfo package

To get rid of this problem, you have to simply install kernel-debuginfo package:
# yum install kernel-debuginfo
Please note that the installed kernel-debuginfo package must be for the same kernel release level and processor, so you may have to enter the following command:
# yum install kernel-debuginfo-KERNEL-VERSION-NUMBER

Hope this troubleshooting tip will help you out while working with systemtap (stap) scripts.

Finally, today I had implemented NIC bounding (bind both NIC so that it works as a single device). Bonding is nothing but Linux kernel feature that allows to aggregate multiple like interfaces (such as eth0, eth1) into a single virtual link such as bond0. The idea is pretty simple get higher data rates and as well as link failover. The following instructions were tested on:

  1. RHEL v4 / 5 / 6 amd64
  2. CentOS v5 / 6 amd64
  3. Fedora Linux 13 amd64 and up.
  4. 2 x PCI-e Gigabit Ethernet NICs with Jumbo Frames (MTU 9000)
  5. Hardware RAID-10 w/ SAS 15k enterprise grade hard disks.
  6. Gigabit switch with Jumbo Frame

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How to: Compile Linux kernel modules

This is one the essential and important task. Many time we upgrade our kernel and some precompiled drivers won't work with Linux. Especially if you have weird hardware; then vendor may send you driver code aka C files to compile. Or even you can write your own Linux kernel driver. Compiling kernel driver is easy. Kernel 2.6.xx makes it even much more easier. Following steps are required to compile driver as module:

1) You need running kernel source code; if you don't have a source code download it from kernel.org. Untar kernel source code (tar ball) in /usr/src using tar command:
$ tar -zxvf kernel* -C /usr/src

To be frank kernel headers are more than sufficient to compile kernel modules / drivers. See how to install kernel headers under Debian / Ubuntu Linux or RHEL / CentOS / Fedora Linux.

2) Next go to your kernel module source code directory and simply create the Makefile file as follows (assuming your kernel module name is foo):
$ vi Makefile

3) Add following text to it:

obj-m = foo.o
KVERSION = $(shell uname -r)
        make -C /lib/modules/$(KVERSION)/build M=$(PWD) modules
        make -C /lib/modules/$(KVERSION)/build M=$(PWD) clean

4) Compile module using make command (module build can be done by any user) :
$ make
It will finally creates the foo.ko module in current directory. You can see all actual compile command stored in .foo* files in same directory.

5) Once module compiled successfully, load it using insmod or modprobe command. You need to be root user or privileged user to run insmod:
# insmod foo.ko

Example: hello.c module

1) hello.c C source code. Copy following code and save to hello.c
$ mkdir demo; cd demo
$ vi hello.c

2)Add following c source code to it:

#include <linux/module.h>       /* Needed by all modules */
#include <linux/kernel.h>       /* Needed for KERN_INFO */
#include <linux/init.h>         /* Needed for the macros */
static int __init hello_start(void)
printk(KERN_INFO "Loading hello module...\n");
printk(KERN_INFO "Hello world\n");
return 0;
static void __exit hello_end(void)
printk(KERN_INFO "Goodbye Mr.\n");

This is an example modified from original source for demonstration purpose.

3) Save the file. Create new Makefile as follows:
$ vi Makefile
Append following make commands:

obj-m = hello.o
KVERSION = $(shell uname -r)
        make -C /lib/modules/$(KVERSION)/build M=$(PWD) modules
        make -C /lib/modules/$(KVERSION)/build M=$(PWD) clean

4) Save and close the file.

5) Compile hello.c module:
$ make

6) Become a root user (use su or sudo) and load the module:
$ su -
# insmod hello.ko

Note you can see message on screen if you are logged in as root under run level 3.

7) Verify that module loaded:
# lsmod | less

8) See message in /var/log/message file:
# tail -f /var/log/message

9) Unload the module:
# rmmod hello

10) Load module when Linux system comes up. File /etc/modules use to load kernel boot time. This file should contain the names of kernel modules that are to be loaded at boot time, one per line. First copy your module to /lib/modules/$(uname -r)/kernel/drivers. Following are suggested steps:

(a) Create directory for hello module:
# mkdir -p /lib/modules/$(uname -r)/kernel/drivers/hello
(b) Copy module:
# cp hello.ko /lib/modules/$(uname -r)/kernel/drivers/hello/
(c) Edit /etc/modules file under Debian Linux:
# vi /etc/modules
(d) Add following line to it:
(e) Reboot to see changes. Use lsmod or dmesg command to verify module loaded or not.
# cat /proc/modules
# lsmod | less

See also:

  • Read man pages of lsmod, rmmod, modprobe, modules
  • Documentation located in your kernel source directory (for example /usr/src/linux-2.6.xx.xx/Documentation/) and README file located under kernel source code tree /usr/src/linux-2.6.xx.xx/README
  • Read TLDP.org tutorial online.