kernels

Unhide is a little handy forensic tool to find hidden processes and TCP/UDP ports by rootkits / LKMs or by another hidden technique. This tools works under both Linux / Unix, and MS-Windows operating systems. From the man page:

It detects hidden processes using three techniques:

  1. The proc technique consists of comparing /proc with the output of /bin/ps.
  2. The sys technique consists of comparing information gathered from /bin/ps with information gathered from system calls.
  3. The brute technique consists of bruteforcing the all process IDs. This technique is only available on Linux 2.6 kernels.

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Didn’t take long to release new updated version.

The Debian project is pleased to announce the sixth update of its stable distribution Debian GNU/Linux 4.0 (codename “etch”). This update mainly adds corrections for security problems to the stable release, along with a few adjustment to serious problems. This update has been rated as having important security impact. You are advised to upgrade system ASAP.

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RHEL 5.2 beta has been released. Red Hat engineers backport many of the new features from later kernels to the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 kernel, such as support for new hardware and virtualization enhancements. This provides Red Hat Enterprise Linux subscribers with important new capabilities while maintaining stable application interfaces — so that applications […]

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So how do you find out how fast is your hard disk under Linux? Is it running at SATA I (150 MB/s) or SATA II (300 MB/s) speed without opening computer case or chassis?

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As many of you may already know, Google uses a version of Red Hat to power their servers, running on old kernels. Check out Toby DiPasquale’s Google internal talk (slides). To be frank I am only aware of 2 or 4 way standard cluster system. But this is a massive parallel system build by Google […]

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Explains how to monitor bandwidth with Linux iptables command.

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