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Quick Tip: Find Hidden Processes and Ports [ Linux / Unix / Windows ]

Unhide is a little handy forensic tool to find hidden processes and TCP/UDP ports by rootkits / LKMs or by another hidden technique. This tools works under both Linux / Unix, and MS-Windows operating systems. From the man page:

It detects hidden processes using three techniques:

  1. The proc technique consists of comparing /proc with the output of /bin/ps.
  2. The sys technique consists of comparing information gathered from /bin/ps with information gathered from system calls.
  3. The brute technique consists of bruteforcing the all process IDs. This technique is only available on Linux 2.6 kernels.

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Debian GNU/Linux 4.0 Update 6 Released

Didn't take long to release new updated version.

The Debian project is pleased to announce the sixth update of its stable distribution Debian GNU/Linux 4.0 (codename "etch"). This update mainly adds corrections for security problems to the stable release, along with a few adjustment to serious problems. This update has been rated as having important security impact. You are advised to upgrade system ASAP.
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Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.2 Beta Released

RHEL 5.2 beta has been released. Red Hat engineers backport many of the new features from later kernels to the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 kernel, such as support for new hardware and virtualization enhancements. This provides Red Hat Enterprise Linux subscribers with important new capabilities while maintaining stable application interfaces -- so that applications continue to run after new updates are installed. And, of course, it’s always worth repeating that updates, which are released about twice a year, are included with every Red Hat Enterprise Linux subscription.

This will give our you a chance to see what your systems will be running later this year. You can grab beta version from RHN.

=> Press Release : Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.2 Beta

HowTo: Linux Check IDE / SATA Hard Disk Transfer Speed

So how do you find out how fast is your hard disk under Linux? Is it running at SATA I (150 MB/s) or SATA II (300 MB/s) speed without opening computer case or chassis?
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Google internal and Linux

As many of you may already know, Google uses a version of Red Hat to power their servers, running on old kernels.

Check out Toby DiPasquale's Google internal talk (slides). To be frank I am only aware of 2 or 4 way standard cluster system. But this is a massive parallel system build by Google for performance.

Interesting and massive stuff used by Google and powered by penguin :) (via Lyz Krumbach blog)

How To Monitor Bandwidth With iptables

Simple and quick way to set up straightforward bandwidth monitoring with iptables,"Linux has a number of useful bandwidth monitoring and management programs. A quick search on Freshmeat.net for bandwidth returns a number of applications. However, if all you need is a basic overview of your total bandwidth usage, iptables is all you really need -- and it's already installed if you're using a Linux distribution based on the 2.4.x or 2.6.x kernels" ..

Full article: online here.