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The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) is a United States copyright law. Google has removed an open-source project that enables the proprietary CoreAVC high-definition video decoder to run under Linux operating system.

CoreAVC is a Windows codec for H.264 video developed by CoreCodec, which sells the codec in two versions, one priced at US$7.95 and another at $14.95. A Linux version is not available.

CoreAVC-for-Linux was an open-source project led by Google that developed patches which allow Linux applications, such as mplayer, to use the CoreAVC codec. A cached version of the project's Web page said video performance was the main motivation for creating Linux support for CoreAVC.

=> Google Takes Down Open-source Project After DMCA Complaint

Update [ 11:29 pm IST ] : A CoreCodec worker using the screen name BetaBoy told an internal forum last night that "The DMCA removal request and the project reinstatement was been sent to Google."

andLinux is a complete Ubuntu Linux system running seamlessly in Windows 2000 based systems (2000, XP, 2003, Vista [32-bit only]). This project was started for Dynamism for the GP2X community, but its userbase far exceeds its original design. andLinux is not just for development and runs almost all Linux applications without modification.

andLinux provides XFCE and KDE desktop.

Download andLinux

=> Visit official project to grab latest version.

Virtualization: Run Windows and Linux at One Place

I've used VMWARE ESX / Xen paravirtualization, Virtuozzo, Solaris Containers, and FreeBSD Jails as os level virtualization. Virutalbox is another full virtualization solution. Presently, VirtualBox runs on Windows, Linux and Macintosh hosts and supports a large number of guest operating systems including but not limited to Windows (NT 4.0, 2000, XP, Server 2003, Vista), DOS/Windows 3.x, Linux (2.4 and 2.6), and OpenBSD.

Virtualization: Run Windows and Linux at One Place

Rakesh has published a small article about VirtualBox Virtualization software. Both Windows and Linux can be run together simultaneously, and you don't even need to switch between the two. With the seamless Windows feature of the latest version of VirtualBox virtualization software, you can seamlesssly run both Windows and Linux applications from the same desktop interface. This has been made possible by the combined efforts of VirtualBox and SeamlessRDP that is meant for seamless Windows support for rdesktop.

=> How to run Windows and Linux at one place? [ciol.com]

How to: Sync BlackBerry with Linux Desktop

The BlackBerry is a wireless handheld which I used mainly for office e-mail, telephone, text messaging and other wireless information services. Joe has published some interesting information about syncing BlackBerry on Linux:
If you use Linux on your desktop, and you also happen to have a BlackBerry handheld device, you're probably aware that Research in Motion, the company that develops the BlackBerry platform, offers nothing in the way of support for its devices on Linux -- but the intrepid geeks in the free software world do.

How to: Sync BlackBerry with Ubuntu Linux Desktop

Thanks to to the efforts of the Barry and OpenSync projects, I just finished syncing my BlackBerry 8800 with my Evolution contacts on my Ubuntu 7.10 desktop.

If all you want to do is share data between your Linux box and the BlackBerry, no sweat. The 2GB Micro SD storage I inserted in my 8800 is available to my Linux system just like any other USB storage device. When I connect the USB cable to the BlackBerry, I simply say yes when Ubuntu asks if I want to enter Mass Storage Mode, and I can copy music and photos to the phone. I have run into a problem getting the audio for videos that were created with Kino to work correctly, but other than that, moving data back and forth between the PDA and the desktop "just works."

=> Syncing your BlackBerry on Linux