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Linux desktop

Linux / UNIX Desktop Fun: Let it Snow On Your Desktop

Feeling lonely this holiday season? Try Xsnow. This little app will let it snow on the Unix / Linux desktop. Santa and his reindeer will complete your festive season feeling with moving snowflakes on your desktop, with Santa Claus running all over the screen.
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The Best Open Source Graphics And Design Software

A few years ago Novell conducted an online public survey to determine which MS-Windows apps need to be ported on Linux desktop. Adobe Photoshop and other graphics application that user want ported to Linux. However, Linux comes with the sheer numbers of open source software projects produced by the community. You may overwhelmed by the choices available under Linux and not know where to begin. [click to continue…]

Do You Blame Users For IT Security?

An interesting article published by security guru Bruce Schneier:

Blaming the victim is common in IT: users are to blame because they don't patch their systems, choose lousy passwords, fall for phishing attacks, and so on. But, while users are, and will continue to be, a major source of security problems, focusing on them is an unhelpful way to think.

=> Blaming the user is easy – but it's better to bypass them altogether

Nokia To Add LGPL Option For the Qt UI and Application Framework

Good news for all developers! QT will be available under the LGPL starting with version 4.5. The GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL) is a free software license published by the Free Software Foundation. The LGPL places copyleft restrictions on the program itself but does not apply these restrictions to other software that merely links with the program. There are, however, certain other restrictions on this software. The LGPL is primarily used for software libraries, although it is also used by some stand-alone applications, most notably Mozilla and OpenOffice.org.

This option could increase Qt usage and adoption. You may see more cross platform commercial application on the Linux desktop. This is huge news for cross-platform developers.
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New Notification System for GNOME and KDE

Canonical the makers of Ubuntu about to introduce a new desktop notification system proposal. New changes should improve the usability of the Linux desktop including desktop notification system for both GNOME and KDE. From the Mark Shuttleworth blog:

The key proposals we are making are that:

* There should be no actions on notifications.
* Notifications should not be displayed synchronously, but may be queued. Our implementation of the notification display daemon will display only one notification at a time, others may do it differently.

That’s pretty much it. There are some subtleties and variations, but these are the key changes we are proposing, and which we will explore in a netbook device with a partner, as well as in the general Ubuntu 9.04 release, schedule gods being willing.

I think new changes looks more like Growl system used in Mac OS X. You can read more about proposal including mockup video that shows new notification system here.

Linux Desktop Enhancements

Linux Desktop Customization

Linux Desktop Customization

Awesome! Here are few more Linux customization resources for you.

8 Great Alternative Desktop Managers For Linux

Various UNIX / Linux desktop managers (personally I'm big fan of both Gnome and Fluxbox), from the post:

Most of the Linux users should be familiar with Gnome and KDE since both of them are the most commonly used desktop managers in the various Linux distros. Now, if you are using an old PC with low hardware specs, you might find that the above two desktop environments are too heavy for your computer to handle.

In this case, you will have to consider using an alternative lightweight desktop manager for your Linux. Here are 8 of the best lightweight desktop managers that I personally use and recommend.

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What will desktop Linux be like four years from now?

InfoWeek has an interesting article about the open-source future - What Linux Will Look Like In 2012:

Our open source expert foresees the future of Linux: By 2012 the OS will have matured into three basic usage models. Web-based apps rule, virtualization is a breeze, and command-line hacking for basic system configuration is a thing of the past.

I don't know about others but I'm using Linux desktop since 1999 and it won't change in 2012. May be it will be look like ;)
vivek@desktop:~ $

=> What Linux Will Look Like In 2012