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Linux desktop

Flickr is well know image hosting website, web services and an online community platform for sharing stuff.

FlickerFs

Flickrfs is a virtual filesystem which mounts on your linux machine like any other partition. Once mounted, it retrieves information about your photos hosted on your flickr account, and shows them as files. You can now easily copy photos from your local machine to this mount, and it will automatically upload them to your flickr account. Similary, you can copy the files from your mount to your local machine, and it will download your images from flickr.

Manish has all the information about installing FlickerFS under Linux and Ubuntu computer.

Desktop Flickr Organizer

Desktop Flickr Organizer (DFO) is a flickr photos organizer right on your Linux desktop. helps you store and manage a local backup of your Flickr photos. It also lets you tag, organize, comment on and manage those photos from your desktop.


(Fig. 01: DFO in action)

=> Download DFO software (via Wired how to wiki)

Ubuntu Linux Multimedia Installation

A nice guide for installing common multimedia software under a fresh Ubuntu Linux:

You've just download the latest and greatest version of Ubuntu Linux and it didn't cost you a thing. You breezed through the installation and a brand new desktop is staring you in the face -- now what?

There are a few things you'll need to do if you want to get the most out of your Linux desktop. But don't worry, none of this is too complicated. In fact, it's much easier than trying to do the same on Windows or a Mac.

=> Optimize Fresh Ubuntu Installation

Linus Torvalds on Linux Desktop Operating System

Don Reisinger wonders - if Linus Torvalds even speaking for Linux anymore:

Even though Linus Torvalds has always been known as a deity-like figure in the world of Linux, lately he has been quite outspoken about where he thinks his operating system is going and what its competitors are doing wrong.

Wired blog has published Linus Torvalds thoughts on why users aren't flocking to Linux:

As always there's a laundry list of things Torvalds doesn't care about -- Open Solaris and Sun, for instance -- but his thoughts on the future of the Linux desktop are interesting, including this bit: "I have never, ever cared about really anything but the Linux desktop."

You can read Linus Torvalds thoughts on the Linux desktop and its broader adoption here.

Compiz brings to life a variety of visual effects that make the Linux desktop easier to use, more powerful and intuitive, and more accessible for users with special needs. It is an OpenGL-based compositing and window-manager. Compiz is the original compositing window manager from Novell's XGL project. It is developed by David Reveman and community.

Compiz is one of the first compositing window managers for the X Window System that uses 3D graphics hardware to create fast compositing desktop effects for window management.

By default Compiz configuration settings manager is not installed under Ubuntu Linux 7.10. So first install compiz manager:
$ sudo apt-get install compizconfig-settings-manager

Please note that compiz only worked with 3D hardware which was supported by Xgl. Most NVIDIA and ATI graphics cards are known to work with Compiz on Xgl. On board Intel card (Intel GMA) also reported working with compiz.

Turn on 3D Compiz Effects

Right Click on Desktop > Change Desktop Background > Select Visual Effect Tab > Select Extra or Custom
Ubuntu Linux: Turn on 3D Compiz Effects for the X Window System
(click to enlarge image)

Save the changes.

How do I use or see the 3D effects?

Now everything is turned on, but how do you use it? Just hit the following key combinations to see effects:

  • ALT + TAB: Switch windows
  • Windows key + Tab: Switch windows
  • Ctrl + Alt + Left/Right Arrow: Switch desktops on cube
  • Ctrl + Alt + Left-click anywhere on wallpaper and drag
  • Try minimizing and maximizing windows
  • Try Dragging windows
  • Double click titlebar
  • Windows key+right-click Zoom-in once
  • Windows key + wheel mouse up : Zoom-in manually

To get idea about 3D effects, please see following youtube video (video may not work inside RSS reader, so click here to view the same):

Further readings:

Compiz Documentation

Looks like Linux adoption getting stronger and stronger each day :)

Adobe Flex is a software development kit and an IDE for a group of technologies initially released in March of 2004 by Macromedia to support the development and deployment of cross platform, rich Internet applications based on their proprietary Macromedia Flash platform.

Now Adobe has announced Flex Builder Linux Alpha. This is a native Linux port of the Flex Builder IDE based on Eclipse for building rich Internet applications:

Flex Builder Linux is a plugin-only version of the Flex Builder that you can use to build Flex applications on Linux. We wanted to get an early release out with the base Flex Builder features so you could begin to provide us with your feedback and let us know your priorities for additional features.

Download Adobe Flex IDE for Linux Desktop

=> Visit official site to download Adobe Flex IDE for Linux

Windows XP has a small option called Run as command.. You can add similar option to Linux desktop to open or run file as root via a right click. The following tutorial explains how to add a context menu item that enables a Linux user to open files as the root user when browsing their file system using nautilus. This script feature allows the user to navigate their file system and open or edit any file or directory as the root user of the system. It's a perfect solution for those that are not completely comfortable using terminal commands.

=> How to open files as root via a right click

IBM to help and promote OpenOffice.org office suite

Finally big blue has announced that it will support and promote OpenOffice.org office suite. These are the same companies once promoted Microsoft product. Dell, HP and IBM will one day force more Linux desktop systems and open source software for all of us:

The OpenOffice.org community today announced that IBM will be joining the community to collaborate on the development of OpenOffice.org software. IBM will be making initial code contributions that it has been developing as part of its Lotus Notes product, including accessibility enhancements, and will be making ongoing contributions to the feature richness and code quality of OpenOffice.org. Besides working with the community on the free productivity suite's software, IBM will also leverage OpenOffice.org technology in its products.

This is great news for the tens of millions of users of OpenOffice.org and the thousands of individual members of the project”, said John McCreesh, OpenOffice.org Marketing Project Lead. “We welcome IBM's contributions to further enhancing the OpenOffice.org product. But equally important is IBM's future commitment to package and distribute new works that leverage OpenOffice.org technology supporting the ISO ODF standard. ODF is a once in a generation opportunity for the IT industry to unify round a standard, and deliver lasting benefit to users of desktop technology.”

=> IBM JOINS OPENOFFICE.ORG COMMUNITY [openoffice.org]