linux-distributions

Server provisioning is nothing but load the Linux or UNIX like operating systems automatically with actual operating systems, device drivers, data, and make a server ready for network operation without any user input. Typically you select a server from a pool of available servers, load the operating systems (such as RHEL, Fedora, FreeBSD, Debian), and finally customize storage, network (IP, gateway, bounding etc), drivers, applications, users etc. Using the following tools you can perform automated unattended operating system installation, configuration, set virtual machines and much more. These software can be used to install a lot (say thousands) of Linux and UNIX systems at the same time.

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Generally, all Linux distributions needs a scheduled reboot once to stay up to date with important kernel security updates. RHN (or other distro vendors) provides Linux kernel security updates. You can apply kernel updates using yum command or apt-get command line options. After each upgrade you need to reboot the server. Ksplice service allows you to skip reboot step and apply hotfixes to kernel without rebooting the server. In this post, I will cover a quick installation of Ksplice for RHEL 5.x and try to find out if service is worth every penny.

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Linux desktop distribution shootout – an open-source 7 OS comparison.

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Open source Java technology debuts in GNU/Linux distributions – Latest releases of Fedora and Ubuntu Linux feature OpenJDK-based implementations.

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This guy sits his girlfriend down at a brand-new Ubuntu Linux installation and asks her to perform some basic tasks.

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Ksplice is an open source project out of MIT that automates the process of applying security patches to the Linux kernel without rebooting Linux box.

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Sun Microsystems is stepping up efforts to boost Java usage in Linux shops by working to remove some final encumbrances in the open-source Java platform.

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