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They say - there's no such thing as a free lunch. But, Linux and FOSS software can be used to start, run and grow your business for, you guessed it, free. February survey of IT managers by IDC indicated that hard times are accelerating the adoption of Linux. The open source operating system will emerge from the recession in a stronger data center position than before, concluded an IDC white paper. Reducing costs and stronger interoperability with Windows were listed as the two top issues in a new survey of IT managers.
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Missing Memory

Today, I've upgraded total 8 servers from 4GiB to 8GiB to improve performance of system by inserting additional memory modules. We started each server and checked for memory count at console. All severs booted normally after the upgrade and services such as SMTP, NFS, CIFS, HTTP started as expected. Shortly, afterwords I got a call from help desk about pop3 server for slow performance.
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Debunking the "Linux is virus free" Myth

Is Linux is virus free? The author of foobar blog provides some insight about the same. Linux users can't just catch a virus by email or downloading malware from the Internet, contrary to "those Windows users".
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Ubuntu Pocket Guide and Reference has been released and available for download from the official (authors') website. This guide is written by Keir Thomas and he claims that it is a totally unique and concise guide for everyday Ubuntu user.
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Excellent article! It explains how programs are laid out in memory.

From the blog post:

Memory management is the heart of operating systems; it is crucial for both programming and system administration. In the next few posts I’ll cover memory with an eye towards practical aspects, but without shying away from internals. While the concepts are generic, examples are mostly from Linux and Windows on 32-bit x86. This first post describes how programs are laid out in memory. Each process in a multi-tasking OS runs in its own memory sandbox. This sandbox is the virtual address space, which in 32-bit mode is always a 4GB block of memory addresses.

=> Anatomy of a Program in Memory

Linux Convert ext3 to ext4 File system

Some time ago ext4 was released and available for Linux kernel. ext4 provides some additional benefits and perforce over ext3 file system. You can easily convert ext3 to ext4 file system. The next release of Fedora, 11, will default to the ext4 file system unless serious regressions are seen. In this quick tutorial you will learn about converting ext3 to ext4 file system.
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Recently, I noticed that the timeout values differ on CentOS v5.x and RHEL Linux 5.x guests on VMWare ESX4 and ESX3.5. I've notices that older ESX 3.5 set a 60 secs timeout and ESX4.x set to 180 secs. Luckly you can fix it easily:
Edit /etc/udev/rules.d/99-vmware-scsi-udev.rules,
# vi /etc/udev/rules.d/99-vmware-scsi-udev.rules
Sample config:

RUN+="/bin/sh -c 'echo 180 >/sys$DEVPATH/device/timeout'"

Find timeout value (180) and change it as per your requirements. Make sure you install the vmware-tools RPM.