mount command

If your network is heavily loaded you may see some problem with Common Internet File System (CIFS) and NFS under Linux. By default Linux CIFS mount command will try to cache files open by the client. You can use mount option forcedirectio when mounting the CIFS filesystem to disable caching on the CIFS client. This is tested with NETAPP and other storage devices and Novell, CentOS, UNIX and Red Hat Linux systems. This is the only way to avoid data mis-compare and problems.

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If you forgot your root password, you can simply reset it. The general procedure for resetting password is as follows (if you are a Linux user, see how to reset Linux root password): a) At boot> prompt force openbsd to boot into a single user mode b) Next mount file system in read-write mode c) […]

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With FreeBSD version 5.4 and above the booting procedure is slightly changed. The older version of FreeBSD uses the boot -s option at Ok prompt. However, with FreeBSD version FreeBSD 5.4+ you don’t have to type any commands. Here is the procedure to boot FreeBSD into a single user mode to reset root password.

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The idea and commands in this article submitted by Jacques Wagener via email. In his own words, “After nuking my partition by accident (and through my stupidity) I was really disappointed in myself, especially in losing my bookmarks and rss-feeds”. The following article is based upon our email communication. I am just putting them as […]

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NFS (Network File System) client allows you to access shared directory from Linux client. The computer sharing the directory is called the NFS server (it can be NAS server too) and the computers or devices connecting to that server are called clients. The clients need to use the mount command to access the shared directory.

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/dev/shm is nothing but implementation of traditional shared memory concept. It is an efficient means of passing data between programs. One program will create a memory portion, which other processes (if permitted) can access. This will result into speeding up things on Linux.

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If you have, a password protected grub boot loader and you forgot both root and grub password, then you can recover grub-boot loader password using the following method/procedure:

* Use Knoppix cd
* Remove the password from Grub configuration file
* Reboot the system
* Change the root password
* Setup new Grub password if required (optional)

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