operating systems

Excellent article! It explains how programs are laid out in memory.

From the blog post:

Memory management is the heart of operating systems; it is crucial for both programming and system administration. In the next few posts I’ll cover memory with an eye towards practical aspects, but without shying away from internals. While the concepts are generic, examples are mostly from Linux and Windows on 32-bit x86. This first post describes how programs are laid out in memory. Each process in a multi-tasking OS runs in its own memory sandbox. This sandbox is the virtual address space, which in 32-bit mode is always a 4GB block of memory addresses.

=> Anatomy of a Program in Memory

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After reading this article, you should now be able to use the Korn shell in ways you may not have known before. Mastering the command line can simplify your work and help you better understand how to make the shell and command line work for you rather than you working harder for it.

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Understanding anatomy of security-enhanced Linux (SELinux) architecture and implementation.

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You can install latest Ubuntu Linux 8.04 under Windows Vista / XP without creating a new parition with a new tool called Wubi. It is a Ubuntu installer for Windows users that will bring you into the Linux world with a single click.

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Linux, Mac OS X, Vista and XP: head-to-head – Operating systems at war – but who wins?

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The Art of Unix Programming by Eric Raymond is a book about the history and culture of Unix programming from its earliest days in 1969 to now, covering both genetic derivations such as BSD and conceptual ones such as Linux. You should read this book if you are an experienced Unix programmer who is often […]

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This is a philosophical post on why Linux hasn’t grown to challenge Windows as the most popular operating system. From the blog post: Linux isn’t very popular on the desktop. It’s a far third behind OS X, which is a very far second behind Windows. Most people cite pre-installed operating systems as the reason. But […]

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