≡ Menu

package management system

Synaptic Removed From Ubuntu Linux v11.10

Synaptic is a front-end for the apt package management system. The program allows you to perform all actions of the command line tool apt-get in a graphical environment such as installing, upgrading, downgrading and removing of single packages or even upgrading your whole system. The upcoming Ubuntu Linux version 11.10 (code named Oneiric Ocelot) has removed Synaptic Package Manager.
[click to continue…]

Download of the day: RPM Software Package Manager Version 5.0

RPM 5.0.0 has been released.

RPM Package Manager is a software package manager for UNIX and Linux distribution. It is a powerful and command-line package management system capable of installing, uninstalling, verifying, querying, and updating Unix binary / source software packages. RPM was originally written in 1997 by Erik Troan and Marc Ewing for use in the Red Hat Linux distribution. These you can use RPM under many Linux distribution and various UNIX variant such as AIX / OpenSolaris etc. From the press release:

After seven months of comprehensive development, the popular Unix software packaging tool RPM Package Manager (RPM) was released as stable version 5.0.0. The relaunch of the RPM project in spring 2007 and today's following availability of RPM 5 marks a major milestone for the previously rather Linux-centric RPM. RPM now finally evolved into a fully cross-platform and reusable software packaging tool.

What is new in RPM 5.0.0?

The Automake/Autoconf/Libtool-based build environment of RPM was completely revamped from scratch and as one major result mostly all third-party libraries now can be linked externally and in a very flexible way.

Support for the ancient and obsolete "rpmrc" files was completely removed, as everything is now configured through RPM "macros" under run-time only.

The RPM code base was ported to all major platforms, including the BSD, Linux, Solaris and Mac OS X Unix flavors and Windows/Cygwin.

The RPM packages, in addition to the default Gzip and optional Bzip2 compression, now support also LZMA compression.

Finally, support for the old RPMv3 (LSB) package format was removed to cleanup and simplify the code base. RPM 5, with respect to RPM format packages, now supports RPMv4 format only.

Additional features for use in package specifications (.spec files) were added, including new standard and even custom tags, new standard sections, etc. Most notably, RPM is now able to automatically track vendor distribution files with its new vcheck(1) based "%track" section and now can automatically download the vendor distribution files, too.

Download RPM v5.0

RPM 5.0 Project home page

So Who maintains RPM?

LWN has an interesting write up about RPM:

Once upon a time, RPM was the "Red Hat Package Manager." In a bid to establish RPM as a wider standard - and, perhaps, to get some development help - Red Hat tried to turn RPM into a community project - rebranding it as the "RPM Package Manager" in the process. But core RPM development remained at Red Hat, under the care of an employee named Jeff Johnson. That, it would seem, is where the trouble starts.

Download of the day: Project Indiana OpenSolaris Developer Preview ISO

Project Indiana is working towards creating a binary distribution of an operating system built out of the OpenSolaris source code. The distribution is a point of integration for several current projects on OpenSolaris.org, including those to make the installation experience easier, to modernize the look and feel of OpenSolaris on the desktop, and to introduce a network-based package management system into Solaris.

The resulting distribution is a live-CD install image, and is fully permissible to be redistributed by anyone. It will also have the capability for developers to create their own, customized distribution based on Project Indiana.

Now the first preview version is available. This is an x86-based LiveCD install image, containing some new and emerging OpenSolaris technologies. This may result in instabilities that lead to system panics or data corruption.

Among the features contained in this release are:

  • Single CD download, with LiveCD 'try before you install' capabilities
  • Caiman installer, with significantly improved installation experience
  • ZFS as the default filesystem
  • Image packaging system, with capabilities to pull packages from network repositories
  • GNU utilities in the default $PATH
  • bash as the default shell
  • GNOME 2.20 desktop environment

Download Project Indiana OpenSolaris Developer Preview ISO

=> Visit the official site to grab ISO file