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private key

The Courier mail server is a mail transfer agent (MTA) server that provides ESMTP, IMAP, POP3, webmail, and mailing list services with individual components. But, it is best known for its IMAP / IMAPs and POP3 / POP3s (secure version) server component.

Courier can provides support for both regular UNIX operating system account (stored in /etc/passwd) and virtual mail account managed by third party backends such as OpenLDAP, MySQL and so on.

In this quick tutorial, you will learn about installing Courier IMAP SSL digital certificate.
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In this tutorial you will learn about Installing SSL Certificate (Secure Server Certificate) to secure communication between Postfix SMTP server and mail client such as Outlook or Thunderbird.
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I've already written about howto log in, on your local system, and make passwordless ssh connections using ssh-keygen command. However, you cannot just follow these instructions over and over again, as you will overwrite the previous keys.

It is also possible to upload multiple public keys to your remote server, allowing one or more users to log in without a password from different computers.

Step # 1: Generate first ssh key

Type the following command to generate your first public and private key on a local workstation. Next provide the required input or accept the defaults. Please do not change the filename and directory location.
workstation#1 $ ssh-keygen -t rsa
Finally, copy your public key to your remote server using scp
workstation#1 $ scp ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub user@remote.server.com:.ssh/authorized_keys

Step # 2: Generate next/multiple ssh key

a) Login to 2nd workstation

b) Download original the authorized_keys file from remote server using scp:
workstation#2 $ scp user@remote.server.com:.ssh/authorized_keys ~/.ssh

c) Now create the new pub/private key:
workstation#2 $ ssh-keygen -t rsa

d) Now you have new public key. APPEND this key to the downloaded authorized_keys file using cat command:
workstation#2 $ cat ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub >> ~/.ssh/authorized_keys

e) Finally upload authorized_keys to remote server again:
workstation#2 $ scp ~/.ssh/authorized_keys user@remote.server.com:.ssh/

You can repeat step #2 for each user or workstations for remote server.

Step #3: Test your setup

Now try to login from Workstation #1, #2 and so on to remote server. You should not be asked for a password:
workstation#1 $ ssh user@remote.server.com
workstation#2 $ ssh user@remote.server.com

Updated for accuracy.

The SSH protocol is recommended for remote login and remote file transfer which provides confidentiality and security for data exchanged between two computer systems, through the use of public key cryptography. The OpenSSH server provides this kind of setup under Linux. It is installed by default. This how-to covers generating and using ssh keys for automated usage such as:

  1. Automated Login using the shell scripts.
  2. Making backups.
  3. Run commands from the shell prompt etc.

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