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Linux Shell Script to reboot DSL or ADSL router

If you need to reboot the router then you need to use web interface or telnet interface. Both methods take time, especially if you are playing with ACL, NAT or router firewall or you just wanna reboot the router from your Linux desktop. I have created simple script using expect tool to reboot router. Make sure you have expect command installed. Use rpm or apt-get command to install expect tool.

Shell script

Create a script as follows (tested on Beetel ADSL 220x router):

#!/usr/bin/expect -f
 
set timeout 20
 
# router user name
set name "admin"
 
# router password
set pass "PASSWORD"
 
# router IP address
set routerip "192.168.1.254"
 
# Read command as arg to this script
set routercmd [lindex $argv 0]
 
# start telnet
spawn telnet $routerip
 
# send username & password
expect "Login:"
send -- "$name\r"
expect "Password:"
send -- "$pass\r"
 
# get out of ISP's  Stupid menu program, go to shell
expect " -> "
send --  "sh\r"
 
# execute command
expect "# "
send -- "$routercmd\r"
# exit
send -- "^D"

Save script and setup executable permission on it:
$ chmod +x router.exp

How do I run this script?

You need to pass command to script to execute on a router. For example to display router uptime, interface information and to reboot router you need to type command as follows:
$ ./router.exp uptime
$ ./router.exp ifconfig
$ ./router.exp reboot

Since my ISP router offers menu as soon as login above script may not work on generic router such as Cisco or linksys router. Therefore, you may need to modify above script to work with your router. If you are a new to expect then use autoexpect command to generate script. It watches you interacting with another program and creates an Expect script that reproduces your interactions For straightline scripts, autoexpect saves substantial time over writing scripts by hand. Even if you are an Expect expert, you will find it convenient to use autoexpect to automate the more mindless parts of interactions. It is much easier to cut/paste hunks of autoexpect scripts together than to write them from scratch. Moreover, if you are a beginner, you may be able to get away with learning nothing more about Expect than how to call autoexpect. Just type autoexecpt:
$ autoexpectautoexpect started, file is script.exp

Next type telnet command (telnet to the router):
$ telnet 192.168.1.254
Output:

Login: USER
Password: Password

Now type commands on the router:
$ ifconfig
$ exit

You are done, type exit to stop autoexepct command:
$ exit
Output:

autoexpect done, file is script.exp

Just type ./script.exp to run ifconfig command:
$ ./script.exp
You can now modify script.exp to reboot or to run other commands. It is a real lifesaver.

See also:

Linux Shutdown Command and Logfile

In the enterprise Linux setup, it is necessary to keep the track of server shutdown and reboot time. Most of you may have used the shutdown / reboot command.
[click to continue…]

Howto Reboot or halt Linux system in emergency

Linux kernel includes magic system request keys. It was originally developed for kernel hackers. However, you can use this hack to reboot, shutdown or halt computer safely (remember safe reboot/shutdown == flush filesystem buffers and unmount file system and then reboot so that data loss can be avoided).

This is quite useful when Linux based system is not available after boot or after a X server crashed ( svgalib program crashes) or no display on screen. Sysrq key combo forces the kernel to respond it regardless of whatever else it is doing, unless it is completely locked up (dead).

Using further extension to iptables called ipt_sysrq (new iptables target), which allows you to do the same as the magic sysrq key on a keyboard does, but over the network. So if your network server is not responding you can still reboot it. Please note that Magic SysRq support need to be compiled in your kernel. You need to say "yes" to 'Magic SysRq key (CONFIG_MAGIC_SYSRQ)' when configuring the kernel. I'm assuming that you have Magic SysRq key' support is compiled in your kernel.

Enable sysrq keys

By default it is not enabled on many Linux distributions. Add or modify following line (as soon as new Linux system installed) /etc/sysctl.conf:
# vi /etc/sysctl.conf
Append following config directive:
kernel.sysrq=1
Save and close the file. Reload settings:
# sysctl -p

Save and close the file and reboot system to take effect

How do I use the magic SysRq keys in emergency?

You need to use following key combination in order to reboot/halt/sync file system etc:
ALT+SysRq+COMMAND-KEY

The 'SysRq' key is also known as the 'Print Screen' key. COMMAND-KEY can be any one of the following (all keys need to hit simultaneously) :

  • 'b' : Will immediately reboot the system without syncing or unmounting your disks.
  • 'o' : Will shutdown your system off (if configured and supported).
  • 's': Will attempt to sync all mounted filesystems.
  • 'u' : Will attempt to remount all mounted filesystems read-only.
  • 'e' : Send a SIGTERM to all processes, except for init.
  • 'h': Show help, indeed this the one you need to remember.

So whey you need to tell your Linux computer to reboot or when your X server is crashed or you don't see anything going across the screen then just press:

ALT+SysRQ+s : (Press and hold down ALT, then SysRQ (Print Screen) key and press 's') -Will try to syn all mounted system

ALT+SysRQ+r : (Press and hold down ALT, then SysRQ (Print Screen) key and press 'r') -Will reboot the system.

If you wish to shutdown the system instead of reboot then press following key combination:
ALT+SysRQ+o

ipt_sysrq is a new iptables target that allows you to do the same as the magic sysrq key on a keyboard does, but over the network. Sometimes a remote server hangs and only responds to icmp echo request (ping). Every administrator of such machine is very unhappy because (s)he must go there and press the reset button. It takes a long time and it's inconvenient. So use the Network Magic SysRq and you will be able to do more than just pressing a reset button. You can remotely sync disks, remount them read-only, then do a reboot. And everything comfortably and only in a few seconds. Please see Marek Zelem page to enableIP Tables network magic SysRq function.

For more information read official Documentation for sysrq.c version 1.15 stored in /usr/src/linux/Documentation/sysrq.txt and read man page of sysctl, sysctl.conf.

FreeBSD comes with different utilities, which can be use to gathered the information as per your needs. uname command is use to print system information. dmesg command is use to print kernel ring buffer information. sysctl command is use to configure kernel parameters at runtime as well as to read hardware information.

Following list summaries, all the command you need to gather FreeBSD hardware information.

1) Determining the Hardware Type/platform:
# uname -m
2) Determining machine processor architecture:
# uname -p
3) Determining FreeBSD release level:
# uname -r
Generally, following command is use to get all info at a time:
# uname -mrs
Output:

FreeBSD 5.0-RELEASE i386

4) Determining CPU information such as speed, make etc
# dmesg | grep CPU
Output:

CPU: Pentium 4 (1716.41-MHz 686-class CPU)
acpi_cpu0:  on acpi0
acpi_cpu: CPU throttling enabled, 8 steps from 100% to 12.5%

5) Determining real and available memory to FreeBSD:
# dmesg | grep memory
Output:

real memory  = 201326592 (192 MB)
avail memory = 188555264 (179 MB) 

Alternatively, try following command to grab memory information:
# sysctl -a | grep hw.*mem
# sysctl -a | grep mem

Output:

hw.physmem: 194985984
hw.usermem: 167641088
hw.cbb.start_memory: 2281701376

Note systcl has more info, just type the sysctl command to see rest of all information:
# sysctl -a | less
6) Determining how long a system has been up:
# uptime
7) Determining when a system was last rebooted or shutdown:
# last -1 reboot
# last -1 shutdown

8) Determining swap file system usage
# swapinfo -k
9) Determining who is logged in and what they are doing. Following all commands can be used. users command displays the list of all logged in users only.
# w
# who
# users

10) Find out when user was last logged in - You can use last command as follows:
# last user-name
(a) To find out user vivek was last logged, enter:
# last vivek

See FreeBSD getsysinfo.bash script. It is use to find general FreeBSD system information such as, hostname, OS version, Kernel version, Processor/CPU, Total RAM, System load, network interface, total logged in users, Hard disks, Runlevel etc. Make sure your read the detailed installation instruction.