security updates

The Flashback Trojan, is a trojan horse affecting personal computer systems running Apple Mac OS X. More than half a million Apple computers have been infected with the Flashback Trojan.

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Adobe announced that the Flash player for Linux will only be available for Google Chrome browser on Linux and has announced their plans to abandon future updates of Flash player for Linux. From the blog post:

For Flash Player releases after 11.2, the Flash Player browser plugin for Linux will only be available via the “Pepper” API as part of the Google Chrome browser distribution and will no longer be available as a direct download from Adobe. Adobe will continue to provide security updates to non-Pepper distributions of Flash Player 11.2 on Linux for five years from its release.

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CentOS Linux version 6 has been released. It is a community-supported operating system based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) version 6. CentOS Linux is considered as the most popular Linux distribution for web servers with almost 30% of all Linux servers using it.

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Generally, all Linux distributions needs a scheduled reboot once to stay up to date with important kernel security updates. RHN (or other distro vendors) provides Linux kernel security updates. You can apply kernel updates using yum command or apt-get command line options. After each upgrade you need to reboot the server. Ksplice service allows you to skip reboot step and apply hotfixes to kernel without rebooting the server. In this post, I will cover a quick installation of Ksplice for RHEL 5.x and try to find out if service is worth every penny.

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Debian project today released a pair of security updates to plug at least ten security holes in its core called Linux kernel. Several vulnerabilities have been discovered in the Linux kernel that may lead to a denial of service or privilege escalation. This update has been rated as having important security impact.

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Ksplice is an open source project out of MIT that automates the process of applying security patches to the Linux kernel without rebooting Linux box.

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There are a lot of flavors of Linux on the market, each with its own unique features and quirks. Businesses are usually willing to pony up for one of the “Big Two”: Red Hat or Novell/Suse. Regular folks, on the other hand, are more likely to download one of the free alternatives.

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