shutdown command

A typical question asked by many new Linux users. The answer is pretty simple: Your partitions are not being unmounted properly when you last shutdown the Linux desktop. Linux needs to shutdown properly (I’m sure this applies to Windows and Mac OS too) before powered off. If you skip this step there could be data […]

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Recently updated/posted Linux and UNIX FAQ (mostly useful to Linux/UNIX new administrators or users) : Unzip files in particular directory or folder under Linux or UNIX On Linux how many kernel you can compile at the same time and how many kernel you can load in Linux? How do I save or redirect stdout and […]

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On a production system it is recommended that you disable the [Ctrl]-[Alt]-[Delete] shutdown. It is configured using /etc/inittab (used by sysv-compatible init process) file. The inittab file describes which processes are started at bootup and during normal operation. You need to open this file and remove (or comment it) ctrlaltdel entry. Ctrlaltdel specifies the process […]

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From my mail bag:

I would like to run few commands such as stop or start web server as a root user. How do I allow a normal user to run these commands as root?

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Sometime it is necessary to reboot (or shutdown) windows server. Under UNIX or Linux you can use reboot / hal t/shutdown command via cron jobs or at command. But, when it comes to Windows server there is no built in command exist. Only Windows 2000 Resource Kit offers shutdown command line utility. However, sysinternals has […]

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You need to use the sudo command to grant a permission to other users to shutdown your server. The sudo command allows a permitted user to execute a command as the superuser or another user, as specified in the /etc/sudoers file. Login as a root user and type the visudo command to edit the sudoers file.

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You can use route command to configure routing. Syntax is as follows: route add net {network-address} netmask {subnet} {router-address} Let us assume your router address is 192.168.1.254 and network ID is 192.168.1.0/24, then you can type route command as follows: # route add net 192.168.1.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.254 OR To add a default route: # […]

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