swap space

Linux and other Unix-like operating systems use the term “swap” to describe both the act of moving memory pages between RAM and disk, and the region of a disk the pages are stored on. It is common to use a whole partition of a hard disk for swapping. However, with the 2.6 Linux kernel, swap files are just as fast as swap partitions. Now, many admins (both Windows and Linux/UNIX) follow an old rule of thumb that your swap partition should be twice the size of your main system RAM. Let us say I’ve 32GB RAM, should I set swap space to 64 GB? Is 64 GB of swap space really required? How big should your Linux / UNIX swap space be?

{ 66 comments }

Recently updated/posted Linux and UNIX FAQ: Linux display or change a pre-login message – /etc/issue file PostgreSQL add or create a user account and grant permission for database How do I unzip multiple / many files under Linux? Ubuntu Linux Vim Sorry, the command is not available in this version: syntax on How to format […]

{ 0 comments }

Whenever a Linux system CPU is occupied by a process, it is unavailable for processing other requests. Rest of pending requests must wait till CPU is free. This becomes a bottleneck in the system. Following command will help you to identify CPU utilization, so that you can troubleshoot CPU related performance problems.

{ 147 comments }