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How To Reduce Linux Computer Power Consumption

The Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) specification is an open standard operating system-centic device configuration and power management. You can easily reduce your PC's power consumption through smart activity monitors. You can monitor application usage, system attributes, and user activity to more effectively use the power-management systems of your laptop or desktop computer.

Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) and the power configuration systems built into modern computers provide a wide range of options for reducing overall power consumption. Linux and its associated user space programs have many of the tools necessary to master your PC power consumption in a variety of contexts. Much of the current documentation focuses on modifying your kernel parameters and hdparm settings to reduce unnecessary disk activity. In addition, extensive documentation is available for changing your processor settings to maximize the benefits of dynamic frequency scaling based on your current power source.

This article provides tools and code to build on these power-saving measures by monitoring your application-usage patterns. Use the techniques presented here to change your power settings based on the application in focus, user activity, and general system performance.

You can use old good hdparm to find out how fast is your hard disk under Linux. There is another tool called Bonnie++ which is a benchmark suite that is aimed at performing a number of simple tests of hard drive and file system performance. Then you can decide which test is important and decide how to compare different systems after running it.

Linux.com has published article about a new tool called fio:

fio was created to allow benchmarking specific disk IO workloads. It can issue its IO requests using one of many synchronous and asynchronous IO APIs, and can also use various APIs which allow many IO requests to be issued with a single API call. You can also tune how large the files fio uses are, at what offsets in those files IO is to happen at, how much delay if any there is between issuing IO requests, and what if any filesystem sync calls are issued between each IO request. A sync call tells the operating system to make sure that any information that is cached in memory has been saved to disk and can thus introduce a significant delay. The options to fio allow you to issue very precisely defined IO patterns and see how long it takes your disk subsystem to complete these tasks.

=> Inspecting disk IO performance with fio

Solaris 10 update 8/07 has been released and available for download. From the announcement page:
The latest update of the Solaris OS helps customers alleviate common enterprise problems such as virtualization, resource management, and system performance. Solaris delivers built-in investment protection and new technologies that are even better suited to data intensive environments where price and performance are driving factors:

New updated features

=> Solaris Containers for Linux Applications and integrated support for Logical Domains
=> Update to the performance-optimized and cost-effective PostgreSQL open-source database software.
=> Ability to run multiple independent network stacks on one system
=> Networking and DTrace technology enhancements

Best of all, it's free to download and use. The only thing customers pay for are the support and services, which range in scope and price to suit the needs of individual developers and companies of all sizes.

Download Sun Solaris 10 UNIX CD / DVD ISO

=> Visit official site to download Solaris ISO images.

What Is /dev/shm And Its Practical Usage

/dev/shm is nothing but implementation of traditional shared memory concept. It is an efficient means of passing data between programs. One program will create a memory portion, which other processes (if permitted) can access. This will result into speeding up things on Linux.
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